Babasaheb Ambedkar Analysis

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Dr B R Ambedkar, popularly known as Babasaheb Ambedkar, was an Indian jurist, economist, political scientist, sociologist, anthropologist and social reformer who laid down the modern Buddhist movement and fought against the social discrimination of dalits, women and labour. Throughout his life, staunchly advocated for social justice and equality, which are bed rock of Indian constitution. He was first post independent India's law minister and played pivotal role to draft the constitution of modern India.
Annihilation of Caste is a prolific work by Babasaheb and some social scientist opined that his book, occupies a place similar to what The Communist Manifesto once did in the world communist movement. Originally Ambedkar prepared a speech for
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Based on his contemporary times, Ambedkar writes that organizations including the Indian National Congress (INC) argued that political reform must precede social reform. In opposition, the Social Conference, which is a wing of INC insisted on social change must precede over political reforms. However, the urgency of social reform has been sidelined, as the majority of the Hindu community remained indifferent to the unjust social conditions prevalent in the society and, instead, desperately focused on finding emancipation from British …show more content…
Caste divides the society into small groups and membership is based on ascription criteria. The castes teach us a fundamental social principle of hierarchy. At the top of this hierarchy is the Brahmin caste and at the bottom is the untouchable caste. It proscribes inter caste marriages and inter caste dining and thus effectively prevents social mobility.
Caste system prevents the uplift and incorporation of the aboriginal’s tribes:
Ambedkar states that, Schedule Tribes lives in a deplorable world even without access to the fruits of modernity. He further says that, unlike Christian missionaries, Hindu’s never tried to civilize tribes rather classified them as criminals. If Hindu’s sole aim is to preserve his caste and safeguard the racial purity then how Hindu’s accommodate and cultivate sense of fellow human being feeling! However Nehru's Panchsheel for Tribal Development was an effort to integrate the tribes into main stream India.
A reply to Gandhi by

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