Analysis Of The Yellow Wallpaper By Charlotte Perkins Gilman

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The short story “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, takes place in the 19th century. The story begins just after the main character Jane gives birth to her first child. Shortly after she suffers from what is now known as postpartum depression. She tells the story through a series of diary entries which she keeps a secret from her husband as this disobeys her medical instructions. “The Yellow Wallpaper” explains the importance of American feminist literature, as well as attitudes towards women’s health in the 19th century. Jane undergoes a lot of pressure throughout the short story. When Jane became depressed shortly after having her daughter, her husband John thinks he has a new-found responsibility over Jane. John is also …show more content…
John takes authority over Jane’s life, thoughts, health care, and decisions. Jane is unable to share her thoughts without conformation from her husband. She is forced to hide her thoughts and her illness in order to represent a happy and successful marriage. A typical marriage role in the 19th century, men were superior and women were seen as the lesser, so women wouldn’t stand up for themselves. Men looked at and thought of women as being inferior and not able to make their own decisions. In this situation it caused Jane to be seen as hysterically instead of realizing her deeper underlying illness as what it is postpartum depression. This illness, common today was easily overlooked and disputed in the 19th century because of lack of education and men’s social hierarchy over …show more content…
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, was born on July 3, 1860 in Hartford, Connecticut. She struggled as a child after her dad abandoned her and her family. Shortly after, Gilman’s mother slowly detached herself from Gilman and her siblings. Gilman than began to spend most of her time at the public library to overcome her feelings of rejection from her parents. According to C.D. Merriman from online-literature, in 1878 Gilman enrolled in Rhode Island School of Design writing articles and poems for many local journals. Just a few months into the marriage of Charles Walter Stetson, Gilman was pregnant and began to suffer with depression symptoms. After Gilman gave birth to her first daughter Katharine, her postpartum depression symptoms greatly increased. She saw Dr. Silas Weir Mitchell, the same doctor in her short story “The Yellow Wallpaper.” Dr. Silas Weir Mitchell was the doctor that favored the “rest cure” for treatment of nervous disorders. Gilman tried to follow Dr. Mitchell’s orders but was unable to withstand his treatment for no more than a few months. Gilman emphasized the danger of Dr. Mitchell’s diagnosis and treatment by relating her own feelings and emotions into the short story “The Yellow Wallpaper.” She wanted to make people aware that the “rest cure” wasn’t a reliable treatment for her false

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