Theories Of Guilt

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Cognitive theory surrounding guilt says thoughts of harming or causing misfortune to someone causes emotions associated with guilt, because feeling that you are responsible for someone else’s grief or hardship produces a negative emotion. I agree with this theory because guilt can arise from actual happenings, to thoughts or fantasies about doing something out of the norm of society or what society sees as acceptable. Communication is not always at its best and people can feel guilt when there is poor communication or miscommunication because they feel as though they have created anxiety, harm or sadness in another person, sometimes even when that is not the case. Guilt can be an overwhelming emotion that can affect the decisions that people …show more content…
The juror overwhelms themselves with the negative emotion because they have misinterpreted the feelings associated with the decisions that they made and that they should feel guilty for harming someone else’s family, friends and even the convict himself. When the emotions of chronic guilt become overbearing and affect many other aspects of one’s life they are considered to be “automatic thoughts”. Therapy to help recognize and understand the dysfunctional thoughts, relieving the anxiety associated with the guilt, and beginning to work on a healthy lifestyle is imperative. The term “making a mountain out of a molehill” is a great description of guilt because most often one internalizes the feelings of wrong doing and feels as though they have had a great negative impact on others, while most often the others do not carry the feelings of being wronged that we as a guilty person feel we have inflicted. The “mountain” built from guilt is most often just a “molehill” from another point of view. People often feel that their presence and actions carry a much greater weight in others lives than it actually …show more content…
Guilt often guides society’s actions whether it is in a good or bad fashion. Guilt, both short term and chronic, has affected my life in many ways. I, as a mother, have felt guilty for making poor choices in relationships that have affected my daughters’ lives immensely. The guilt stems from the fact that I made a bad choice, I actually did do something wrong in my eyes, causing a lifelong detriment to my daughters, because I chose a man that was unprepared to be a father. The psychological pain that my daughters have endured due to my choices and their fathers’ actions primarily caused me chronic guilt that over time has subsided knowing that the conscious choice to remove myself from a violent relationship did my children more good than harm. I felt guilty because the relationship I was in was not healthy and was equal to lying, stealing, or cheating in my own code of ethics. I did not want my kids to see the behavior from their fathers as I also felt guilty for their behaviors, even though I could not control them. My past choices cannot be changed and moving forward to reduce the guilt was essential and is still a daily process. Situations arise with my 16yr old daughter and the guilt often resurfaces as she looks for that father figure that is not present. I overcompensated for my guilt when she was younger by giving

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