Anti-Hero And Heroism In John Milton's Paradise Lost

Great Essays
Paradise lost is a poem written by John Milton that explains the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and how they were tempted by one of God’s fallen angels Satan. Throughout the books Satan defies God and the debate starts whether Satan is a hero or anti-hero. I find in books one and two Satan appears more of a hero and that Blake was of not the Devils party.
Book one of paradise lost explains that Milton was not of the devils’ party in regards to Satan was once an angel of light until he went against God. Satan rises off the Lake and challenges God with his speech to get God’s angels to turn there back and join the devils’ army. Satan in this circumstance looks like a hero to readers because he decided to go against the powerful god.
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Satan may be perverse, but his desire for revenge gives him energy and that energy makes his character interesting and exciting. Milton made Satan fascinating in regards that it is easier to make characters evil than ideally good ones. Evil can be interesting, inspire you, and have its own since of beauty. Milton condemned evil but showed it in the ways of Satan’s temptations. Milton exposed the willful, self centered, revenge hungry parts of Satan and his attitude comes off as heroism. We are told of the heroic setting of the poem and shown the experience first hand the thrill of coming in contact with sin. The situations are dramatized and makes the devil look more of the hero since his character is emphasized more than God’s. Hero is a word that is derived from warrior and fits Satan’s character well in all his schemes and in the fact paradise was lost because of Satan. Satan was talked about the most and in order for him to remain the hero the entire poem should remain about him like it does. Milton knew very well what he was doing when he created Satan and know that people would relate to the devil because it shows the struggles of human life. Milton truly believes that war on Heaven was …show more content…
It picks up right after Satan and his fallen angels lose to the heavens and are banished to hell as punishment. We may not know it, but we are beginning to feel sympathy towards Satan. We continue to feel sympathetic towards Satan and our sympathy is compounded until a plan is hatched by all the fallen angels in "Pandemonium" (Pandemonium is the name of the castle they build in hell) to soil God 's newest creation, man. Here we see Satan volunteering to travel through hell and anti-matter all the way to Earth in order to corrupt Adam & Eve. This is where I lost all sympathy towards Satan who knew he could have repented but instead said "Better to rule in hell than serve in Heaven" you see Satan entering Paradise and starts feeling envy and despair. At first, Satan seemed fine with his evil plan to manipulate his character into something other so he could enter paradise. For a minute, Satan loses his evil thoughts to the scenery of paradise. There was a moment Satan told himself that no matter what in his head he could make a heaven out of hell but come to realize that wasn’t true. Satan knew that when he rejected his opportunity in book three to repent and ask God for forgiveness that he was going to be punished for his actions. After seeing how beautiful paradise was, the devil could not forget about hell and remembered his actions to stay there and following through with his

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