Anna's Case Study In Nursing

2313 Words 10 Pages
Anna is a fifty five year old woman who was admitted to the Emergency Department of Victoria Hospital in London, Ontario for pelvic pain and postmenopausal bleeding. Upon further assessment, it was discovered that Anna is currently homeless, unemployed, and has little contact with her family. During the nurse’s head-to-toe assessment it was found that the patient had abdominal distention and her physician ordered an X-ray for her to determine if a gastrointestinal issue caused this distention. Once this was ruled out, Anna’s physicians continued to search for the underlying cause of her abdominal distention, in addition to her other admitting symptoms. Anna was then admitted to the hospital as an inpatient on the medicine unit. The day following …show more content…
Ultrasound is commonly used as the first test performed if there is a suspected problem with the ovaries (American Cancer Society, 2016b). A ultrasound can be useful to determine whether there is a tumour present in the ovaries or if there is a fluid-filled cyst (American Cancer Society, 2016b). Additionally, an ultrasound is able to show the internal structure of the ovaries which can help the medical team decide whether the mass is concerning (American Cancer Society, 2016b). In Anna’s case, it was determined that the underlying problem was in her ovaries. Anna was then sent for a Computerized Tomography (CT) Scan to screen for ovarian masses. After the completion of the CT scan, a suspected mass was found and in response, a different type of CT Scan was completed called a CT-guided needle biopsy, which involves a needle being inserted into the mass to extract some of its contents for examination (American Cancer Society, 2016b). The examination of the tissue revealed that it was malignant. Further examination found Anna’s ovarian cancer to be stage four and had metastasized to her fallopian tubes and uterus, which are common with when this type of cancer has progressed (Lengyel, …show more content…
15.5% of Canadians over the age of twelve, approximately 4.6 million people reported to not have a regular GP (Statistics Canada, 2013). This gap in the healthcare system impacted Anna’s situation because she was one of the many Canadians living without a family doctor. Attending regular check-ups with a GP are important because they can help identify problems in early stages when the chances of a positive response to treatment and cure are higher (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015). Had Anna been regularly seeing a GP, they might have caught her cancer earlier, as her symptoms could have been detected as those commonly associated with ovarian cancer. Additionally, if Anna had a GP, he or she could have referred her to be screened for the BRCA gene, as she had a family history of ovarian cancer. Screening for mutations within the BRCA gene for those with a family history of ovarian cancer can be used as a prognostic and preventive tool for detection and prevention, as mutation to this gene put people at an increased risk for developing ovarian cancer (Toss et al.,

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