Analysis Of The Souls Of Black Folk By W. E. B. Du Bois

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In his book, The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois outlines his experience as an African American in the post war years. Du Bois chronicles his subsequent realization of the general issues facing the African American community during reconstruction. Using personal anecdotes and historical references, Du Bois attempts to paint a portrait of the struggles faced by African Americans. Du Bois is able to pinpoint key issues in the culture that inhibit democracy to fully reach the lives of the newly freed slaves. These political and cultural issues are translated as the overall themes presented in the book. Du Bois hopes that in drawing attention to these themes, the country will be able see the inherent deficiencies in the American system, …show more content…
In discussing the political climate of reconstruction Du Bois refers to atrocities such as rape, murder, and lynching as acts of revenge against the freed slaves. Racism did not die with slavery, its simply evolved. During reconstruction, racism became entrenched within the American Political system. The subsequent failures of the Freedman’s Bureau expanded poverty amongst the African American community. This poverty would lead to racisms cousin, oppression. Were as African Americans were unable to fully enjoy the spoils of a democratic life such as suffrage, education, and land ownership. Pulling from the lessons of Du Bois, we can see that the theme of persistent racism is still relevant today. Though not as overt as in our nations past, this new form of “diet racism” leaves African Americans at a systematic disadvantage. Poverty, education, and unemployment, are just some of the many problems African Americans at disproptatianly large numbers. According to Bill Quigley, a Law Professor at Loyola University the biggest crime in the U.S. criminal justice system is that it is a race-based institution where African-Americans are directly targeted and punished in a much more aggressive way than white …show more content…
The passage of the 15th Amendment attempted to exerted democracy to African Americans, yet Jim Crow laws and voter intimidation would effectively deny African Americans votes. The Civil Rights movements of the 1960s would further increase the ability of African American to vote, but the War on Drugs and our criminal justice system is finding unique ways to continue voter suppression. This is a direct result of Du Bois idea of the persistence of racism. It is our societies underlying prejudice that is the back bone to the prevention of democracy from truly reaching all members of our society. As Du Bois states……quaote on ending racism or something A national discussion on the persistence of racism is America is all together necessary in order to expand democracy. Yes we have had such discussion in the past, during reconstruction and the Civil Rights movement, but the conversation should never end. With the previously mentioned issues of our criminal justice system, we can also see that inherent prejudices continue to inhibit other minority groups such as undocumented workers. They to are not afforded the fruits of democracy. How can a nation rooted in democratic principles continue to oppress those who are deemed as second class

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