Analysis Of 'My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun By William Shakespeare

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As novelist and playwright Gao Xingjian states, "It 's in literature that true life can be found. It 's under the mask of fiction that you can tell the truth” (Xingjian 2008). I begin to wonder if Xingjian 's insight can be applied to all texts in literature, and whether the truth is in fact guarded by the writer 's literary style. Perhaps it is the technique that gives clues to allow me, the reader, to decipher the hidden truth. I wonder if the writing style highlights the philosophy, or if the philosophy is what encourages the use of a certain technique. Furthermore, as I come across various texts, I begin to understand the interconnection between a writer 's style and the message that he or she is attempting to convey. As a result, …show more content…
It is interesting that different texts are displayed using contrasting styles. However, these writing styles help me see that all texts reveal a startling truth; a philosophy. This leads me to ask: to what extent is literature more about philosophy than technique? As I read "My mistress ' eyes are nothing like the sun” (Sonnet 130), I cannot help but notice Shakespeare 's use of figurative language. His writing style intrigues me as it effectively conceals the reasoning behind the poem. At first, I find it surprising that he speaks negatively about his "mistress" when he compares her to beauty. He describes her as imperfect when he says, "And in some perfumes is there more delight than in the breath that from my mistress reek" (Shakespeare, 1609). When Shakespeare uses the word “reek”, it evokes a negative connotation. This …show more content…
I begin to think that Shelley is warning me of the dangers of human passions gone too far. When Victor begins his work on his creation, he mentions: “A human being in perfection ought always to preserve a calm and peaceful mind, and never to allow passion…to disturb his tranquility” (Shelley 55-56). Even though Victor discusses how one must never allow desires to ruin a peace of mind, he fails to follow this guideline himself. Instead, Victor lets this human flaw ruin his happiness. The verbal irony in this situation informs me of the human nature to lose oneself to obsessions and curiosities. Frankly, Victor frightens me with his way of thinking because he takes these conditions to an extreme level. In this case, Shelley’s writing style raises questions regarding flaws in the human nature that threaten to destroy one’s sanity. On the other hand, acts of selfishness and greed are not only exhibited by Victor Frankenstein, but also by Emma Smith in W.D. Valgardson’s “God Is Not A Fish Inspector”. Valgardson uses similes to highlight the conflict between Emma and her father named Fusi. This contradicts my inquiry question, for without the use of this literary device, Valgardson’s viewpoint appears vague and unclear to me. For instance, Valgardson describes the setting as, “the breakwater that ran along the rest of

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