Amy Watson Mental Illness

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In Amy Watson’s Changing Middle Schoolers Attitudes about Mental Illness Through Education tests the effects of educational programs in teaching students about mental illness stigma. According to Watson, stigma is a serious issue because it prevents individuals from recognizing the issues and possible treatments of mental illness. For example, numerous studies have found that individuals with mental illness are often seen as irresponsible, incompetent, and at fault for their own illnesses. However, despite the concern of reducing mental illness stigma, few studies have focuses on looking on a child perspective. This is important because negative attitudes and behaviors are believed to root back since early childhood. For example, studies have …show more content…
This test which consisted of a Knowledge Test and an Attribution Questionnaire were designed to examine both the efficacy of the program and the attitudes of the students against mental illness prior and after the intervention. The Knowledge Test, which consisted of 12 true or false (or “not sure) items and five open-ended questions reflected the learning objectives of the curriculum. Meanwhile, the 8-item Attribution Questionnaire, developed as a short form of r-a1, tested the attitudes of children against the constructs of mental illness stigma. In addition, two field test selection criteria were developed for this study. This included both experienced and novice teachers in the primary and secondary field site. In both conditions, teachers were responsible for conducting and delivering the field test to the children.
Finally, a SPSS, a form of data analysis, was used to examine the student demographics, frequencies and responses to the Knowledge Test and the r.AQ. These analyses were focused on examining the pre-and posttest differences on individual responses for the two tests, the differences between primary and secondary field test sites and the differences between students with the highest stigma pretest scores and the rest of the
…show more content…
Prior to the study, researchers found that students had limited understanding of the treatments and components of mental illness. For example, most students were aware of the biological and psychosocial causes of mental illness, but lack understanding of its treatments or general aspects. Thus, the results demonstrate compelling evidence of the efficacy of educational programs. For example, researchers found that children were less likely to perceive mental illness as dangerous, feel sorry for a person with a mental illness after receiving the field intervention and more likely to seek treatment if they believe they had a mental problem on their own. Moreover, the study also show significant changes in the attitudes and knowledge of children with the highest stigmatizing attitudes at baseline compared to the rest of

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