Alan Turing: The Father Of The Enigma Machine

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Alan Turing was misunderstood, to say the least. The man we now regard as the father of modern computer science was heavily criticized and discouraged during his life for various reasons. Nonetheless, Turing was an incomparable mathematician way ahead of his time, and he made major contributions to the math and technology fields, helping win World War II and creating a path for modern computers to become a reality. We recognize him today with great honor and respect, but throughout his lifetime, and even for quite some time after, his actions and accomplishments have caused a great deal of scrutiny. However, this doesn’t negate the fact that his accomplishments were indeed noteworthy. So noteworthy, in fact, that his work has made its way to …show more content…
Like the machine itself, the fundamental method of how it works is fairly simple. Using modular arithmetic and public and private numbers, we are able to generate a system that codes and decodes numbers. So first, two public numbers are revealed, say 3 and 10. A message s is sent through the encoding method using the public numbers to result in C = s3 mod 10. The recipient is then told of the code C. To decode the message, a private number, say 3, is used to find the original message, as in S = C3 mod 10. This coding scheme is set up in a way that the senders and recipients of the messages would need to know the codes in order to decipher them, much like in the usage of the enigma …show more content…
To generate a public number, pick two prime numbers, such as 11 and 13. Calculate for m, in which m = (11 - 1)(13 - 1) = 10 x 12 = 120. Find a number not divisible by m, such as 7, the first public number. The second public number is derived from multiplying the two initial numbers, 11 x 13 = 143. The private number is formed using modular arithmetic with the first public number to find d, where 7d = 1 mod 120. So the private number is 103. These three numbers are then used as the codes to encode and decode the messages, much like the codes sent out through the enigma machine during the

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