4th Amendment Essay

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Espionage requires doing things in an illegal manner; however, it should not violate the First Amendment in the United States’ Bill of Rights. The First Amendment stresses the people’s right of freedom of speech. Espionage and freedom of speech were always in conflict with each other as seen in the Supreme Court case Schenck v. United States. During that case, Schenck was convicted of breaking the Espionage Act of 1917 by telling people not to enlist in the army so the American government saw him as a threat. He was only expressing his opinion and not forcing anymore to join so he should have been protected by the First Amendment. In the Brandenburg v. Ohio Supreme Court case, Brandenburg was accused of using terrorism and accused the Supreme …show more content…
The Fourth Amendment emphasizes that people have the right to not be subjected to unreasonable searches and that they are “secure in their persons, house, papers and effects”. Espionage violates this amendment when they search through people that are suspicious and subject them to torment and arrest. An example of unorthodox espionage is the fact that the NSA has been “engaged in an illegal mass surveillance sharing programme that has affected millions of people around the world” as exposed by Edward Snowden, a former NSA contractor (Bowcott). The NSA has been performing surveillance that is very unethical and unjust. This must not continue because it violates America’s law saying that no citizen should be subjected to random searches. Andrew Grosso argues that the fact that the EEA now does wiretapping proves to be a violation of civil liberties and says that “wirestaps are one of the most intrusive of all investigative techniques” (Espionage and Intelligence Gathering 134). Wiretapping does not only violate the First Amendment but the Fourth Amendment as well. With the EAA listening and tracking down all of our messages and phone calls, the citizens of America are subjected to unreasonable searches and anything they say might be taken as threats against the government and United States. The Fourth Amendment should be more enforced when it comes to

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