The Importance Of Citizenship In The United States Constitution

1185 Words 5 Pages
While each section is meant to rectify and address a certain issue, they all work together to achieve one goal which is referred to in the first section, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.” This section makes sure to give citizenship to all people in every state, not just certain states that say so in their state constitution. This was a big deal because it becomes a federal law that states cannot override. Moreover, this made sure the South, specifically, followed this because they were not able to rejoin the union unless they ratified the 14th amendment. This meant that discrimination and guaranteed equal protection …show more content…
Directly, this section keeps our Constitution safe by not allowing any citizen to hold a government position unless they uphold the values of it. Indirectly, it means that anyone who does not uphold the right of citizenship to everyone regardless of color or ethnicity cannot come to power within our government. This is because the 14th amendment protects the civil right of citizenship and to go against the Constitution, you are going against this right. For instance, if a racist southern back in 1868 wanted to become state legislator so that he may have more power to wield against African Americans, he could not because it goes against this amendment. Even if he did somehow come to power, he could be removed by a vote of two-thirds at any time by Congress. This entire section provides a safeguard against any corruptness that wishes to distort or pervert the …show more content…
However, through additional information gained through The American Yawp and our lectures, the picture of American life in 1868 becomes significantly clearer. What is stated explicitly within the document, is that all public debts accrued for payment of services in the suppression of rebellion shall not be questioned and all debts accrued in aid of rebellion against the United States shall be null and void. Indirectly, this is a statement addressing the debts between the Union and the Confederacy after the Civil War. The section is stating that the debts the north believed should be repudiated (debts accrued for payment of services in suppression of rebellion) will not be questioned by the south and the debts the south believe they are owed (they aided in rebellion against the United States, according to the north) will become illegal. For the average American, depending on what side you were on, this section was either beneficial to you or very damaging to your wealth. For example, if you were in the Union, you probably did not have to pay as many taxes in order to fulfil repudiations for the south. However, if you were southern, payments to the north were not to be questioned. This information tells us that America was still very focused on settling the debts that accumulated during the Civil

Related Documents