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1434 Cards in this Set

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abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
The passengers moved abaft of the ship so as to escape the fire in the front of the ship.
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
The mother's public reprimand abased the girl.
The insecure father, after failing to achieve his own life-long goals, abased his children whenever they failed.
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
Due to his poor payment record, it may be necessary to abdicate our relationship with the client.
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
The aberrant flight pattern of the airplane alarmed the air traffic controllers.
His aberrant behavior led his friends to worry the divorce had taken its toll.
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
Since the power failure, the town has been in abeyance.
abhor
(v.) to hate
By the way her jaw tensed when he walked in, it is easy to see that she abhors him.
The dog abhorred cats, chasing and growling at them whenever he had the opportunity.
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
The Haldemans lived in abject poverty, with barely a roof over their heads.
abjure
(v.) to give up
The losing team may abjure to the team that is winning.
abnegation
(n.) a denial
The woman's abnegation of her loss was apparent when she began to laugh.
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
The editor abridged the story to make the book easier to digest.
abaft
(adv.) on or toward the rear of a ship
abandon
(v.; n) to leave behind; to give something up; freedom; enthusiasm; impetuosity
abase
(v.) to degrade; humiliate; disgrace
abbreviate
(v.) to shorten; compress; diminish
abdicate
(v.) to reject, renounce, or abandon
aberrant
(adj.) abnormal; straying from the normal or usual path
abeyance
(n.) a state of temporary suspension or inactivity
abhor
(v.) to hate
abject
(adj.) of the worst or lowest degree
abjure
(v.) to give up
abnegation
(n.) a denial
abominate
(v.) to loathe; to hate
abridge
(v.) to shorten; to limit
abrogate
(v.) to cancel by authority
abrupt
(adj.) happening or ending unexpectedly
abscond
(v.) to go away hastily or secretly; to hide
absolve
(v.) to forgive; to acquit
abstemious
(adj.) sparing in use of food or drinks
abstinence
(n.) the act or process of voluntarily refraining from any action or practice; self-control; chastity
abstruse
(adj.) hard to understand; deep; recondite
abysmal
(adj.) very deep
accede
(v.) to comply with; to consent to
acclaim
(n.) loud approval; applause
accolade
(n.) approving or praising mention; a sign of approval or respect
accomplice
(n.) co-conspirator; partner; partner-in-crime
accretion
(n.)growth by addition; a growing together by parts
accrue
(v.) a natural growth; a periodic increase
acerbic
(adj.) tasting sour; harsh in language or temper
acquiesce
(v.) to agree without protest
acrid
(adj.) sharp; bitter; foul smelling
acrimony
(n.) sharpness or bitterness in language or manner.
adage
(n.) an old saying now accepted as being truthful
adamant
(adj.) not yielding, firm
addled
(adj.) rotten
adept
(adj.) skilled; practiced
adjure
(v.) solemnly ordered
adroit
(adj.) expert or skillful
adulation
(n.) praise in excess
adulterate
(v.) to corrupt, debase, or make impure
adversary
(n.) an enemy; foe
adverse
(adj.) negative; hostile; antagonistic; inimical
advocate
(v.; n.) to plead in favor of; supporter; defender
aesthetic
(adj.) of beauty; pertaining to taste in art and beauty
affable
(adj.) friendly; amiable; good-natured
affiliate
(v.) to connect or associate with; to accept as a member
affinity
(n.) a connection; similarity of structure
aggrandize
(v.) to make more powerful
aghast
(adj.) astonished; amazed; horrified; terrified; appalled
agrarian
(adj.) of the land
alacrity
(n.) eager readiness or speed
alchemist
(n.) a person who studies chemistry
alchemy
(n.) any mysterious change of substance or nature
allegory
(n.) a symbolic description
alleviate
(v.) to lessen or make easier
allocate
(v.) set aside; designate; assign
allude
(v.) to refer indirectly to something
allure
(v.; n.) to attract; entice; attraction; temptation; glamour
allusion
(n.) an indirect reference (often literary); a hint
aloof
(adj.) distant in interest; reserved; cool
altercation
(n.) controversy; dispute
altruism
(n.) unselfish devotion to the welfare of others
altruistic
(adj.) unselfish
amalgam
(n.) a mixture or combination (often of metals)
amalgamate
(v.) to mix, merge, combine
amass
(v.) to collect together; accumulate
ambiguous
(adj.) not clear; uncertain; vague
ambivalent
(adj.) undecided
ameliorate
(v.) to improve or make better
amendment
(n.) a positive change
amiable
(adj.) friendly
amiss
(adj.; adv.) wrong; awry; wrongly; in a defective manner
amity
(n.) friendly relations
amorphous
(adj.) with no shape; unorganized; having no determinate form
amortize
(v.) to put money into a fund at fixed intervals
anachronism
(n.) something out of place in time (e.g., an airplane in 1492)
analogy
(n.) similarity; correlation; parallelism
anaphylaxis
(n.) an allergic reaction
anarchist
(n.) one who believes that a formal government is unnecessary
anchorage
(n.) something that can be relied on
anecdote
(n.) a short account of happenings
animosity
(n.) a feeling of hatred or ill will
anoint
(v.) to crown; ordain;
anomaly
(n.) an oddity, inconsistency; a deviation from the norm
anonymous
(adj.) nameless; unidentified
antagonism
(n.) hostility; opposition
antipathy
(n.) a strong dislike or repugnance
apathy
(n.) lack of emotion or interest
apocalyptic
(adj.) pertaining to a discovery or new revelation
apocryphal
(adj.) counterfeit; of doubtful authorship or authenticity
appease
(v.) to satisfy; to calm
apposite
(adj.) suitable; apt; relevant
apprehensive
(adj.) fearful; aware; conscious
approbatory
(adj.) approving or sanctioning
arable
(adj.) suitable (as land) for plowing
arbiter
(n.) one who is authorized to judge or decide
arbitrary
(adj.) based on one's preference or judgment
arcane
(adj.) obscure; secret; mysterious
archetype
(n.) original pattern or model; prototype
ardent
(adj.) with passionate or intense feelings
arduous
(adj.) laborious, difficult; strenuous
arid
(adj.) extremely dry, parched; barren, unimaginative
aromatic
(adj.) having a smell which is sweet or spicy
arrogant
(adj.) acting superior to others; conceited
arrogate
(v.) to claim or demand unduly
articulate
(v.; adj.) to utter clearly and distinctly; clear, distinct; expressed with clarity; skillful with words
artifice
(n.) skill in a craft
ascetic
(n.; adj.) one who leads a simple life of self-denial; rigorously abstinent
aseptic
(adj.) germ free
askance
(adv.) a sideways glance of disapproval
asperity
(n.) harshness
aspersion
(n.) slanderous statement; a damaging or derogatory criticism
aspirant
(n.) a person who goes after high goals
assay
(n.) to determine the quality of a substance.
assess
(v.) to estimate the value of
assiduous
(adj.) carefully attentive; industrious
assuage
(v.) to relieve; ease; make less severe
astringent
(n.; adj.) a substance that contracts bodily tissues; causing contraction; tightening; stern, austere
astute
(adj.) cunning; sly; crafty
atrophy
(v.; n.) to waste away, as from lack of use; to wither; failure to grow
attenuate
(v.) to thin out; to weaken
atypical
(adj.) something that is abnormal
audacious
(adj.) fearless; bold
augment
(v.) to increase or add to; to make larger
august
(adj.) to be imposing or magnificent
auspicious
(adj.) being of a good omen; successful
austere
(adj.) having a stern look; having strict self-discipline
authentic
(adj.) real; genuine; trustworthy
authoritarian
(n.; adj.) acting as a dictator; demanding obedience
autocracy
(n.) an absolute monarchy; government where one person holds power
autocrat
(n.) an absolute ruler
avarice
(n.) inordinate desire for gaining and possessing wealth
aver
(v.) to affirm as true
awry
(adj; adv.) crooked(ly); uneven(ly); wrong; askew
azure
(adj.) the clear blue color of the sky
baleful
(adj.) harmful, malign, detrimental
banal
(adj.) trite; without freshness or originality
baneful
(adj.) deadly or causing distress, death
baroque
(adj.) extravagant; ornate; embellished
bastion
(n.) a fortified place or strong defense
batten
(v.) to gain
bauble
(n.) a showy yet useless thing
beget
(v.) to bring into being
beholden
(adj.) indebted to
behoove
(v.) to be advantageous; to be necessary
belittle
(v.) to make small; to think lightly of
bellicose
(adj.) quarrelsome; warlike
bemuse
(v.) to preoccupy in thought
benefactor
(n.) one who helps others; a donor
beneficent
(adj.) conferring benefits; kindly; doing good
benevolent
(adj.) kind; generous
benign
(adj.) mild; harmless
berate
(v.) scold; reprove; reproach; criticize
bereft
(v.; adj.) to be deprived of; to be in a sad manner; hurt by someone's death
beseech
(v.) to ask earnestly
besmirch
(v.) to dirty or discolor
bestial
(adj.) having the qualities of a beast; brutal
betroth
(v.) to promise or pledge in marriage
biased
(adj.) prejudiced; influenced; not neutral
biennial
(adj.; n.) happening every two years; a plant which blooms every two years
bilateral
(adj.) pertaining to or affecting both sides or two sides; having two sides
blasphemous
(adj.) irreligious; away from acceptable standards; speaking ill of using profane language
blatant
(adj.) obvious; unmistakable; crude; vulgar
blighted
(adj.) causing frustration or destruction
blithe
(adj.) happy; cheery; merry; a cheerful disposition
bode
(v.) to foretell something
bombast
(n.) pompous speech; pretentious words
bombastic
(adj.) pompous; wordy; turgid
boor
(n.) a rude person
breadth
(n.) the distance from one side to another
brevity
(n.) briefness; shortness
brindled
(adj.) mixed with a darker color
broach
(v.) to introduce into conversation
brusque
(adj.) abrupt in manner or speech
bucolic
(adj.) having to do with shepherds or the country
bumptious
(adj.) arrogant
bungler
(n.) a clumsy person
burgeon
(v.) to grow or develop quickly
burlesque
(v.; n.) to imitate in a non-serious manner; a comical imitation
burly
(adj.) strong; bulky; stocky
burnish
(v.) to polish by rubbing
cabal
(n.) a group of persons joined by a secret
cache
(n.) stockpile; store; heap; hiding place for goods
cacophonous
(adj.) sounding jarring
cacophony
(n.) a harsh, inharmonious collection of sounds; dissonance
cajole
(v.) to coax with insincere talk
calamity
(n.) disaster
caliber
(n.) quality
callow
(adj.) being young or immature
calumny
(n.) slander
canard
(n.) a false statement or rumor
candid
(adj.) honest; truthful; sincere
cant
(n.) insincere or hypocritical statements of high ideals; the jargon of a particular group or occupations
caprice
(n.) a sudden, unpredictable or whimsical change
capricious
(adj.) changeable; fickle
captious
(adj.) disposed to find fault
carte blanche
(n.) unlimited authority
cascade
(n; v.) waterfall; pour; rush; fall
castigate
(v.) to punish through public criticism
cataclysm
(n.) an extreme natural force
catalyst
(n.) anything which creates a situation in which change can occur
catharsis
(n.) a purging or relieving of the body or soul
caustic
(adj.) eating away at; sarcastic words
cavil
(v.) to bicker
censor
(v.) to examine and delete objectionable material
censure
(n.; v.) a disapproval; an expression of disapproval; to criticize or disapprove of
ceremonious
(adj.) very formal or proper
cessation
(n.)ceasing; a stopping
chafe
(v.) to annoy, to irritate; to wear away or make sore by rubbing
chaffing
(n.) banter; teasing
chagrin
(n.) a feeling of embarrassment due to failure or disappointment
charisma
(n.) appeal; magnetism; presence
charlatan
(n.) a person who pretends to have knowledge; an impostor; fake
chary
(adj.) cautious; being sparing in giving
chaste
(adj.) virtuous; free of obscenity
chastise
(v.) to punish; discipline; admonish
cherish
(v.) to feel love for
chicanery
(n.) trickery or deception
chimera
(n.) an impossible fancy
choleric
(adj.) cranky; cantankerous; easily moved to feeling displeasure
chortle
(v.) to make a gleeful, chuckling sound
churlishness
(n.) crude or surly behavior; behavior of a peasant
circumlocution
(n.) a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; not to the point
circumlocutory
(adj.) being too long, as in a description or expression; a roundabout, indirect, or ungainly way of expressing something
circumspect
(adj.) considering all circumstances
citadel
(n.) a fortress set up high to defend a city
clandestine
(adj.) secret
clemency
(n.) mercy toward an offender; mildness
cloture
(n.) a parliamentary procedure to end debate and begin to vote
cloying
(adj.) too sugary; too sentimental or flattering
coagulate
(v.) to become a semisolid, soft mass; to clot
coalesce
(v.) to grow together
coda
(n.) in music, a concluding passage
coddle
(v.) to treat with tenderness
codify
(v.) to organize laws or rules into a systematic collection
coffer
(n.) a chest where money or valuables are kept
cogent
(adj.) to the point; clear; convincing in its clarity and presentation
cogitate
(v.) to think hard; ponder; meditate
cognate
(adj.; n.) having the same family; a person related through ancestry
cognitive
(adj.) possessing the power to think or meditate; meditative; capable of perception
cognizant
(adj.) aware of; perceptive
coherent
(adj.) sticking together; connected; logical; consistent
cohesion
(n.) the act of holding together
cohort
(n.) a group; band
collaborate
(v.) to work together; cooperate
colloquial
(adj.) having to do with conversation; informal speech
collusion
(n.) secret agreement for an illegal purpose
comeliness
(n.) beauty; attractiveness in appearance or behavior
commiserate
(v.) to show sympathy for
commodious
(adj.) spacious and convenient; roomy
communal
(adj.) shared or common ownership
compatible
(adj.) in agreement with; harmonious
complacent
(adj.) content; self-satisfied; smug
complaisance
(n.) the quality of being agreeable or eager to please
compliant
(adj.) complying; obeying; yielding
comport
(v.) fitting in
comprehensive
(adj.) all-inclusive; complete; thorough
compromise
(v.) to settle by mutual adjustment
concede
(v.) to acknowledge; admit; to surrender; to abandon one's position
conceit
(n.) an exaggerated personal opinion
conciliation
(n.) an attempt to make friendly or placate
conciliatory
(adj.) to reconcile
concise
(adj.) in few words; brief; condensed
conclave
(n.) any private meeting or closed assembly
condescend
(v.) to come down from one's position or dignity
condone
(v.) to overlook; to forgive
confluence
(n.) a thing which is joined together
confound
(v.) to lump together, causing confusion; to damn
conglomeration
(n.) a collection or mixture of various things
conjoin
(v.) to combine
conjure
(v.) to call upon or appeal to; to cause to be, appear, come
connivance
(n.) secret cooperation in wrongdoing
connoisseur
(n.) expert; authority (usually refers to a wine or food expert)
connotative
(adj.) containing associated meanings in addition to the primary one
consecrate
(v.) to declare sacred; to dedicate
consequential
(adj.) following as an effect; important
consort
(n.; v.) a companion, spouse; to associate
conspicuous
(adj.) easy to see; noticeable
consternation
(n.) amazement or terror that causes confusion
constrain
(v.) to force, compel; to restrain
consummation
(n.) the completion; finish
contemporary
(adj.) living or happening at the same time; modern
contempt
(n.) scorn; disrespect
contentious
(adj.) quarrelsome
contest
(v.) to attempt to disprove or invalidate
contiguous
(adj.) touching; or adjoining and close, but not touching
contravene
(v.) to act contrary to; to oppose or contradict
contrite
(adj.) regretful; sorrowful; having repentance
contumacious
(adj.) resisting authority
contusion
(n.) a bruise; an injury where the skin is not broken
conundrum
(n.) a puzzle or riddle
conventional
(adj.) traditional; common; routine
converge
(v.) to move toward one point (opposite: diverge)
conviviality
(n.) a fondness for festiveness or joviality
convoke
(v.) a call to assemble
copious
(adj.) abundant; in great quantities
corpulence
(n.) obesity
correlate
(v.) to bring into mutual relation
corroborate
(v.) to confirm the validity
coterie
(n.) a clique; a group who meet frequently, usually socially
covenant
(n.) a binding and solemn agreement
covetous
(adj.) greedy; very desirous
cower
(v.) to huddle and tremble
coy
(adj.) modest; bashful; pretending shyness to attract
crass
(adj.) stupid or dull; insensitive; materialistic
craven
(n.; adj.) coward; abject person; cowardly
culpable
(adj.) deserving blame; guilty
curb
(n.) a restraint or framework
curmudgeon
(n.) an ill-tempered person
cursory
(adj.) hasty; slight
cynic
(n.) one who believes that others are motivated entirely by selfishness.
dais
(n.) a raised platform at one end of a room
dally
(v.) to loiter; to waste time
dank
(adj.) damp and chilly
dauntless
(adj.) fearless; not discouraged
dearth
(n.) scarcity; shortage
debacle
(n.) disaster; collapse; a rout
debase
(v.) to make lower in quality
debauchery
(n.) indulgence in one's appetites
debilitate
(v.) to enfeeble; to wear out
debonair
(adj.) having an affable manner; carefree; genial
decadence
(n.) a decline in morals or art
deciduous
(adj.) shedding; temporary
decisiveness
(n.) an act of being firm or determined
decorous
(adj.) showing decorum; propriety, good taste
decry
(v.) to denounce or condemn openly
defamation
(n.) to harm a name or reputation; to slander
deference
(n.) a yielding of opinion; courteous respect for
deferential
(adj.) yielding to the opinion of another
defunct
(adj.) no longer living or existing
deign
(v.) condescend; stoop
deleterious
(adj.) harmful; hurtful; noxious
deliberate
(v.; adj.) to consider carefully; weigh in the mind; intentional
delineate
(v.) to outline; to describe
deliquesce
(v.) to dissolve
delusion
(n.) a false belief or opinion
demise
(n.) ceasing to exist as in death
demur
(v.; n.) to object; objection; misgiving
denigrate
(v.) to defame, to blacken or sully; to belittle
denounce
(v.) to speak out against; condemn
depict
(v.) to portray; describe
deplete
(v.) to reduce; to empty, exhaust
deposition
(n.) a removal from office or power; a testimony
depravity
(n.) moral corruption; badness
deprecate
(v.) to express disapproval of; to protest against
depredation
(n.) a plundering or laying waste
deride
(v.) to laugh at with contempt; to mock
derision
(n.) the act of mocking; ridicule, mockery
derisive
(adj.) showing disrespect or scorn for
derogatory
(adj.) belittling; uncomplimentary
descant
(v.) lengthy talking or writing
desecrate
(v.) to profane; violate the sanctity of
desist
(v.) to stop or cease
desolate
(adj.) to be left alone or made lonely
despoil
(v.) to take everything; plunder
despotism
(n.) tyranny; absolute power or influence
destitute
(adj.) poor; poverty-stricken
desultory
(adj.) moving in a random, directionless manner
detached
(adj.) separated; not interested; standing alone
deter
(v.) to prevent; to discourage; hinder
determinate
(adj.) distinct limits
devoid
(adj.) lacking; empty
dexterous
(adj.) skillful, quick mentally or physically
diatribe
(n.) a bitter or abusive speech
dichotomy
(n.) a division into two parts or kinds
dictum
(n.) a formal statement of either fact or opinion
didactic
(adj.) instructive; dogmatic; preachy
diffidence
(n.) a hesitation in asserting oneself
diffident
(adj.) timid; lacking self-confidence
diffuse
(adj.) spread out; verbose (wordy); not focused
digress
(v.) stray from the subject; wander from topic
dilettante
(n.) an admirer of the fine arts; a dabbler
diligence
(n.) hard work
diminutive
(adj.; n.) smaller than average; a small person; a word, expressing smallness, formed when a suffix is added
din
(n.) a noise which is loud and continuous
dint
(n.) strength
dirge
(n.) a hymn for a funeral; a song or poem expressing lament
disapprobation
(n.) disapproval
disarray
(n.) (state of) disorder
disavow
(v.) to deny; to refuse to acknowledge
discerning
(adj.) distinguishing one thing from another; having good judgment
discomfit
(v.) to frustrate the expectations of
discord
(n.) disagreement; lack of harmony
discourse
(v.) to converse; to communicate in an orderly fashion
discreet
(adj.) showing good judgment in conduct; prudent
discrete
(adj.) separate; individually distinct; composed of distinct parts
discriminate
(v.) distinguish; demonstrate bias
disdain
(n.; v.) intense dislike; look down upon; scorn
disentangle
(v.) to free from confusion
disheartened
(adj.) discouraged; depressed
disingenuous
(adj.) not frank or candid; deceivingly simple (opposite: ingenious)
disinterested
(adj.) neutral; unbiased (alternate meaning; uninterested)
disparage
(v.) to belittle; undervalue; to discredit
disparate
(adj.) unequal; dissimilar; different
disparity
(n.) difference in form, character, or degree
dispassionate
(adj.) lack of feeling; impartial
disperse
(v.) to scatter; separate
disputatious
(adj.) argumentative; inclined to disputes
dissemble
(v.) to pretend; to feign; to conceal by pretense
disseminate
(v.) to circulate; scatter
dissent
(v.) to disagree; differ in opinion
dissonance
(n.) musical discord; a mingling of inharmonious sounds; nonmusical; disagreement; lack of harmony
dissonant
(adj.) not in harmony; in disagreement
distant
(adj.) having separations or being reserved
distention
(n.) inflation or extension
dither
(v.; n.) to act indecisively; a confused condition
diverge
(v.) separate, split
diverse
(adj.) different; varied
divestiture
(n.) being stripped
docile
(adj.) manageable; obedient; gentle
document
(n.; v.) official paper containing information; to support; substantiate; verify
doggerel
(n.) verse characterized by forced rhyme and meter
dogma
(n.) a collection of beliefs
dogmatic
(adj.) stubborn; biased; opinionated
dormant
(adj.) as if asleep
doting
(adj.) excessively fond of
doughty
(adj.) brave and strong
dowdy
(adj.) shabby in appearance
dubious
(adj.) doubtful; uncertain; skeptical; suspicious
duplicity
(n.) deception
duress
(n.) imprisonment; the use of threats
earthy
(adj.) unrefined
ebullience
(n.) an overflowing of high spirits; effervescence
eccentric
(adj.) odd; peculiar; strange
ecclesiastic
(adj.) pertaining or relating to a church
eclectic
(adj.) picking from various possibilities; made up of material from various sources
economical
(adj.) not wasteful; thrifty
edifice
(n.) a large building
edify
(v.) to build or establish; to instruct and improve the mind
educe
(v.) to draw out; to infer from information
efface
(v.) to erase; to make inconspicuous
effeminate
(adj.) having qualities attributed to a woman; delicate
effervescence
(n.) liveliness; spirit; enthusiasm; bubbliness
effigy
(n.) the image or likeness of a person
effluvium
(n.) an outflow of vapor of invisible particles; a noxious odor
effrontery
(n.) arrogance
effusive
(adj.) pouring out or forth; overflowing
egocentric
(adj.) self-centered, viewing everything in relation to oneself
egress
(n.) a way out; exit
elaboration
(n.) act of clarifying; adding details
elegy
(n.) a poem of lament and praise for the dead
ellipsis
(n.) omission of words that would make the meaning clear
eloquence
(n.) the ability to speak well
elucidate
(v.) to make clear; to explain
elusive
(adj.) hard to catch
emanate
(v.) to emit
embarkation
(v.) to engage or invest in
embellish
(v.) to improve by adding details
eminence
(n.) a lofty place; superiority
emollient
(adj.) softening or soothing to the skin; having power to soften or relax living tissues
emulate
(v.) to try to equal or excel
enamored
(adj.) filled with love and desire
encomium
(n.) formal expression of high praise
encroach
(v.) to trespass or intrude
encumber
(v.) to hold back; to hinder; to burden, load down
endemic
(adj.) native to a particular area; constantly present in a particular country or locality
endorse
(v.) support; to approve of; recommend
enervate
(v.) to weaken; to deprive of nerve or strength
enfeeble
(v.) to make weak
enfranchised
(v.) to free from obligation; to admit to citizenship
engender
(v.) to bring about; beget; to bring forth
enhance
(v.) to improve; compliment; make more attractive
enigma
(n.) mystery; secret; perplexity
enigmatic
(adj.) baffling
ennui
(n.) boredom; apathy
eon
(n.) an indefinitely long period of time
ephemeral
(adj.) very short-lived; lasting only a short time
epicure
(n.) a person who has good taste in food and drink
epigram
(n.) a witty or satirical poem or statement
epilogue
(n.) closing section of a play or novel providing further comment.
epiphany
(n.) an appearance of a supernatural being
epitaph
(n.) an inscription on a monument; in honor or memory of a dead person
epitome
(n.) model; typification; representation
equanimity
(n.) the quality of remaining calm and undisturbed
equinox
(n.) precise time when day and night is of equal length
equivocal
(adj.) doubtful; uncertain
equivocations
(n.) a purposely misleading statement
eradication
(n.) the act of annihilating, destroying, or erasing
errant
(adj.) roving in search of adventure
erratic
(adj.) unpredictable; irregular
erroneous
(adj.) untrue; inaccurate; not correct
erudite
(adj.) having a wide knowledge acquired through reading
eschew
(v.) to shun; to avoid
esoteric
(adj.) understood by only a chosen few; confidential
estimable
(adj.) deserving respect
ethereal
(adj.) very light; airy; heavenly; not earthly
ethnic
(adj.) pertaining to races or peoples and their origin classification, or characteristics
eulogy
(n.) words of praise, especially for the dead
euphemism
(n.) the use of a word or phrase in place of one that is distasteful
euphony
(n.) pleasant combination of sounds
evanescent
(adj.) vanishing quickly; dissipating like a vapor
evasion
(n.) the avoiding of a duty
evoke
(v.) to call forth; provoke
exculpate
(v.) to free from guilt
execute
(v.) to put to death; kill; to carry out; fulfill
exemplary
(adj.) serving as an example; outstanding
exhaustive
(adj.) thorough; complete
exhume
(v.) to unearth; to reveal
exigent
(adj.) a situation calling for immediate attention; needing more than is reasonable
exonerate
(v.) to declare or prove blameless
exorbitant
(adj.) going beyond what is reasonable; excessive
exotic
(adj.) unusual; striking; foreign
expedient
(adj.) convenient in obtaining a result; guided by self-interest
expedite
(v.) to hasten the action of
explicit
(adj.) specific; definite
exposition
(n.) setting forth facts
expunge
(v.) to blot out; to delete
extant
(adj.) existing; refers especially to books or documents
extemporize
(v.) to improvise; to make it up as you go along
extol
(v.) to give great praise
extraneous
(adj.) irrelevant; not related; not essential
extricable
(adj.) capable of being disentangled
exultation
(n.) the act of rejoicing
facetious
(adj.) joking in an awkward or improper manner
facilitate
(v.) make easier; simplify
facsimile
(n.) copy; reproduction; replica
faction
(n.) a number of people in an organization working for a common cause against the main body
fallacious
(adj.) misleading
fallible
(adj.) liable to be mistaken or erroneous
fanatic
(n.) enthusiast; extremist
fastidious
(adj.) difficult to please; dainty
fathom
(v.; n.) to understand; a nautical unit of depth
fatuous
(adj.) lacking in seriousness; vain and silly
fealty
(n.) loyalty
feasible
(adj.) reasonable; practical
fecund
(adj.) productive
feign
(v.) pretend
feint
(v.; n.) to pretend to throw a punch, as in boxing; a fake show intended to deceive
ferment
(v.) to excite or agitate
ferret
(v.; n.) to force out of hiding; to search for; a small, weasel-like mammal
fervent
(adj.) passionate; intense
fervid
(adj.) intensely hot; fervent; impassioned
fervor
(n.) passion; intensity of feeling
fester
(v.) to become more and more virulent and fixed
fetid
(adj.) having a smell of decay
fetish
(n.) anything to which one gives excessive devotion
fetter
(n.) a chain to bind the feet
fickle
(adj.) changeable; unpredictable
fidelity
(n.) faithfulness; honesty
figment
(n.) something made up in the mind
finesse
(n.) the ability to handle situations with skill and diplomacy
finite
(adj.) measurable; limited; not everlasting
fissure
(n.) a cleft or crack
flaccid
(adj.) lacking firmness
flag
(v.) to become weak; to send a message
flagrant
(adj.) glaringly wrong
flamboyant
(adj.) being too showy or ornate
fledgling
(n.; adj.) inexperienced person; beginner
flinch
(v.) wince; drawback; retreat
flippant
(adj.) talkative; disrespectful
flout
(v.) to mock or jeer
fluency
(n.) ability to write easily and expressively
flux
(n.) a flow; a continual change
foist
(v.) to falsely identify as real
foray
(v.) to raid for spoils, plunder
forbearance
(n.) patience; self-restraint
forensic
(adj.) pertaining to legal or public argument
formidable
(adj.) something which causes dread or fear
fortitude
(n.) firm courage; strength
fortuitous
(adj.) happening accidentally
foster
(v.) encourage; nurture; support
fractious
(adj.) rebellious; apt to quarrel
fraught
(adj.) loaded; charged
frenetic
(adj.) frenzied
fret
(v.) to make rough or disturb
frivolity
(adj.) giddiness; lack of seriousness
froward
(adj.) not willing to yield or comply with what is reasonable
frugality
(n.) thrift; economical use or expenditure
fulminate
(v.) to blame, denunciate
fulsome
(adj.) disgusting due to excess
fundamental
(adj.) basic; necessary
furtive
(adj.) secretive; sly
fustian
(n.) pompous talk or writing
futile
(adj.) worthless; unprofitable
gaffe
(n.) a blunder
gainsay
(v.) to speak against; to contradict; to deny
galvanize
(v.) to stimulate as if by electric shock; startle; excite
gamut
(n.) a complete range; any complete musical scale
garbled
(adj.) mixed up; distorted or confused
garish
(adj.) gaudy, showy
garner
(v.) to gather up and store; to collect
garrulous
(adj.) extremely talkative or wordy
gauche
(adj.) awkward; lacking social grace
gauntlet
(n.) a protective glove
generic
(adj.) common; general; universal
genial
(adj.) contributing to life; amiable
genre
(adj.) designating a type of film or book
germane
(adj.) pertinent; related; to the point
gerrymander
(v.) to gain advantage by manipulating unfairly
gibber
(v.) to rapidly speak unintelligibly
glib
(adj.) smooth and slippery; speaking or spoken in a smooth manner
gloat
(v.) brag; glory over
glutton
(n.) overeater
gnarled
(adj.) full of knots; twisted
goad
(n.; v.) a driving impulse; to push into action
gourmand
(n.) one who eats eagerly
grandiose
(adj.) magnificent; flamboyant
gravity
(n.) seriousness
gregarious
(adj.) fond of the company of others
guffaw
(n.) boisterous laughter
guile
(n.) slyness; deceit
guise
(n.) appearance
gullible
(adj.) easily fooled
hackneyed
(adj.) commonplace; trite
haggard
(adj.) untamed; having a worn look
halcyon
(adj.) tranquil; happy
hamper
(v.) interfere with; hinder
haphazard
(adj.) disorganized; random
hapless
(adj.) unlucky; unfortunate
harangue
(n; v.) a lengthy, heartfelt speech; to talk or write excitedly
harbor
(n.; v.) a place of safety or shelter; to give shelter or to protect.
harmonious
(adj.) having proportionate and orderly parts
haughty
(adj.) proud of oneself and scornful of others
hedonistic
(adj.) living for pleasure
heed
(v.) obey; yield to
hefty
(adj.) heavy or powerful
heresy
(n.) opinion contrary to popular belief
heretic
(n.) one who holds opinion contrary to that which is generally accepted
hiatus
(n.) interval; break; period of rest
hierarchy
(n.) a system of persons or things arranged according to rank
hoary
(adj.) whitened by age
homage
(n.) honor; respect
homeostasis
(n.) maintenance of stability
homily
(n.) solemn moral talk; sermon
hone
(n.; v.) something used to sharpen; to sharpen; to long or yearn for
hubris
(n.) arrogance
humility
(n.) lack of pride; modesty
hybrid
(n.) anything of mixed origin
hyperbole
(n.) an exaggeration, not to be taken seriously
hypocritical
(adj.) two-faced; deceptive
hypothetical
(adj.) assumed; uncertain; conjectural
iconoclast
(n.) one who smashes revered images; an attacker of cherished beliefs
ideology
(n.) speculation; representative way of thinking
idiosyncrasy
(n.) any personal peculiarity, mannerism
idyll
(n.) a written piece of work describing a peaceful rural scene
igneous
(adj.) having the nature of fire; volcanic
ignoble
(adj.) ordinary; dishonorable;
ignominious
(adj.) contemptible; disgraced; degrading
illuminate
(v.) make understandable
illusive
(adj.) deceiving, misleading
illusory
(adj.) unreal; false; deceptive
imbue
(v.) to soak or stain; permeate
immaculate
(adj.) perfectly clean; correct; pure
imminent
(adj.) likely to happen without delay
immune
(adj.) exempt from or protected against something
immutable
(adj.) unchangeable; permanent
impale
(v.) pierce through with, or stick on; something pointed
impartial
(adj.) unbiased; fair
impasse
(n.) a situation that has no solution or escape
impassive
(adj.) showing no emotion
impecunious
(adj.) poor; having no money
impede
(v.) to stop the progress of; obstruct
impenitent
(adj.) without regret, shame, or remorse
imperious
(adj.) arrogant; urgent
imperturbable
(adj.) calm; not easily excited
impervious
(adj.) impenetrable; not allowing anything to pass through; unaffected
impetuous
(adj.) moving with great force; done with little thought
impiety
(n.) irreverence toward God; lack of respect
implacable
(adj.) unwilling to be pacified or appeased
implement
(v.; n.) to carry into effect; something used in a given activity
implication
(n.) suggestion; inference
implicit
(adj.) understood but not plainly stated; without doubt
impolitic
(adj.) unwise; imprudent
impromptu
(adj.) without preparation
improvident
(adj.) not providing for the future
impudent
(adj.) disrespectful and shameless
impugn
(v.) to attack with words; to question the truthfulness or integrity
imputation
(n.) to charge, to attribute a fault or misconduct to another
inadvertent
(adj.) not on purpose; unintentional
inanimate
(adj.) to be dull or spiritless; not animated, not endowed with life
inarticulate
(adj.) speechless; unable to speak clearly
inaudible
(adj.) not able to be heard
incessant
(adj.) constant and unending
inchoate
(adj.) not yet fully formed; rudimentary
incidental
(adj.) extraneous; unexpected
incisive
(adj.) getting to the heart of things; to the point
inclined
(adj.) apt to; likely; angled
incognito
(adj.) unidentified; disguised; concealed
incoherent
(adj.) illogical; rambling; disjointed
incommodious
(adj.) inconvenient
incompatible
(adj.) disagreeing; disharmonious not compatible
incompetence
(n.) failing to meet necessary requirements
inconclusive
(adj.) not final or of a definite result
incorporeal
(adj.) not consisting of matter
incorrigible
(adj.) not capable of correction or improvement
incredulous
(adj.) skeptical
inculcate
(v.) to impress upon the mind, as by insistent urging
incursion
(n.) an entry into, especially when not desired
indecipherable
(adj.) illegible
indelible
(adj.) that which cannot be blotted out or erased
indemnify
(v.) to insure against or pay for loss or damage
indict
(v.) charge with a crime
indifferent
(adj.) unconcerned
indigence
(n.) the condition of being poor
indigenous
(adj.) native to a region; inborn or innate
indignant
(adj.) expressing anger to an injustice
indolent
(adj.) lazy; inactive
indomitable
(adj.) not easily discouraged or defeated
indubitably
(adj.) unquestionably; surely
indulgent
(adj.) lenient; patient; permissive
ineluctable
(adj.) something inevitable
inept
(adj.) incompetent; clumsy
inert
(adj.) not reacting chemically; inactive
inevitable
(adj.) sure to happen; unavoidable
infamous
(adj.) having a bad reputation; notorious
infamy
(n.) a bad reputation
infer
(v.) form an opinion; conclude
ingenious
(adj.) clever, resourceful
ingenue
(n.) an unworldly young woman
ingenuous
(adj.) noble; honorable; candid; also naive, simple, artless, without guile
ingratiate
(v.) to bring into one's good graces
ingratitude
(n.) ungratefulness
inherent
(adj.) part of the essential character; intrinsic
inimical
(adj.) hostile, unfriendly
iniquitous
(adj.) wicked; unjust
initiate
(v.; n.) begin; admit into a group; a person who is in the process of being admitted into a group
innate
(adj.) natural; inborn
innocuous
(adj.) harmless; dull; innocent
innovate
(v.) introduce a change; depart from the old
innuendo
(n.) an indirect remark; insinuation
inquisitive
(adj.) eager to ask questions in order to learn
insinuate
(v.) to work into gradually and indirectly
insipid
(adj.) uninteresting, boring flat, dull
insolvent
(adj.) unable to pay debts
instigate
(v.) start; provoke
insubordinate
(adj.) disobedient to authority
insular
(adj.) having the characteristics of an island; narrow-minded, provincial
insularity
(n.) having the characteristics of an island
intangible
(adj.) incapable of being touched; immaterial
intercede
(v.) to plead on behalf of another; mediate
intermittent
(adj.) periodic; occasional
intractable
(adj.) stubborn, obstinate; not easily taught or disciplined
intransigent
(adj.) uncompromising
intrepid
(adj.) fearless, bold
inundate
(v.) to flood; to overwhelm with a large amount of
inured
(adj.) accustomed to pain
inveterate
(adj.) a practice settled on over a long period of time
invoke
(v.) ask for; call upon
iota
(n.) a very small piece
irascible
(adj.) prone to anger
ironic
(adj.) contradictory, inconsistent; sarcastic
irrational
(adj.) not logical
irreparable
(adj.) that which cannot be repaired or regained
irreproachable
(adj.) without blame or faults
itinerary
(n.) travel plan; schedule; course
jaded
(adj.) worn-out
jargon
(n.) incoherent speech; specialized vocabulary in certain fields
jeopardy
(n.) danger; peril
jester
(n.) a person employed to amuse
jettison
(v.) to throw overboard goods to lighten a vehicle; to discard
jocund
(adj.) happy, cheerful, genial, gay
jollity
(n.) being fun or jolly
jovial
(adj.) cheery; jolly; playful
judicious
(adj.) to have or show sound judgment
juncture
(n.) critical point; meeting
juxtapose
(v.) place side-by-side
ken
(v.; n.) to recognize; one's understanding
kindle
(v.) ignite; arouse
kinship
(n.) family relationship; affinity
kith
(n.) relatives and acquaintances
knavery
(n.) a dishonest act
knead
(v.) mix; massage
knotty
(adj.) to be puzzling or hard to explain
labyrinth
(n.) maze
lacerate
(v.) to tear or mangle; to wound or hurt
laconic
(adj.) sparing of words; terse, pithy
laggard
(n.; adj.) a person who has fallen behind; moving slowly
lambaste
(v.) to scold or beat harshly
lambent
(adj.) traveling gently over surface; flickering
lament
(v.; n.) to mourn or grieve; expression of grief or sorrow
languid
(adj.) lacking vitality; indifferent
larceny
(n.) theft; stealing
lascivious
(adj.) indecent; immoral; involves lust
lassitude
(n.) a state of being tired or listless
latency
(n.) a period of inactivity
laud
(v.) praise
lax
(adj.) careless; irresponsible
lecherous
(adj.) impure in thought and act
lethargic
(adj.) lazy; passive
levee
(n.) a landing on the edge of a river or field
levity
(n.) lack of seriousness; instability
lewd
(adj.) lustful; wicked
liaison
(n.) connection; link
liberalism
(n.) believing in personal freedom (favoring reform or progress)
libertine
(n.) one who indulges his desires without restraint
licentious
(adj.) morally lacking in restraint
ligneous
(adj.) having the composition of wood
limber
(adj.) flexible; pliant
lithe
(adj.) easily bent; pliable; supple
litigate
(v.) to involve a lawsuit
livid
(adj.) discolored, as if bruised; extremely angry; furious
loiter
(v.) to spend time aimlessly
loquacious
(adj.) very talkative; garrulous
lucent
(adj.) shining; translucent
lucid
(adj.) shiny; clear minded
lucrative
(adj.) profitable; gainful
lugubrious
(adj.) full of sorrow; mournful
luminous
(adj.) emitting light; shining; also enlightened or intelligent
lunge
(v.) to move suddenly
lurid
(adj.) glowing through haze; shocking, sensational
lustrous
(adj.) bright; radiant; shining
luxuriant
(adj.) to grow with energy and in great abundance
macerate
(v.) to soften by steeping in liquid
maculate
(adj.; v.) spotted, blotched; hence defiled, impure (opposite: immaculate); to stain, spot, defile
magnanimity
(n.; adj.) a quality of nobleness of mind, disdain of meanness or revenge; forgiving; unselfish
malediction
(n.) putting a curse on someone; talking negatively about another
malefactor
(n.) an evil person
malevolent
(adj.) wishing evil (opposite: benevolent)
malicious
(adj.) spiteful; vindictive
malign
(v.; adj.) to speak evil of; having an evil disposition toward others (opposite: benign)
malinger
(v.) to pretend to be ill in order to escape work
malleable
(adj.) easy to shape or bend; pliable
mandate
(n.) order; charge
manifest
(v.; adj.) to show clearly; to appear; obvious, clear
mar
(v.) damage
marauder
(n.) plunderer or raider
materialism
(n.) the belief that everything in the universe is explained in terms of matter; the belief that worldly possessions are the be-all and end-all in life
maudlin
(adj.) foolishly and tearfully sentimental
maverick
(n.) a person who does not conform to the norm
meander
(v.; adj.) wind, wander; winding, wandering aimlessly
melancholy
(n.) depression; gloom
mellifluous
(adj.) having a sweet sound
melodious
(adj.) pleasing to hear
menagerie
(n.) a place to keep or a collection of wild or strange animals
mendacious
(adj.) not truthful; lying
mentor
(n.) teacher; wise and faithful advisor
mercenary
(adj.; n.) working or done for payment only; hired (soldier)
mercurial
(adj.) quick, changeable, fickle
meretricious
(adj.) deceptive beauty - alluring by attractive appearance
mesmerize
(v.) hypnotize
metamorphosis
(n.) change of form
meticulous
(adj.) exacting; precise
mettle
(n.) spirit, courage, ardor
mien
(n.) appearance, being or manner
mimicry
(n.) imitation
minatory
(adj.) threatening
minute
(adj.) extremely small, tiny
mire
(v.) to cause to get stuck in wet, soggy ground
misanthrope
(n.) a person who distrusts everything; a hater of mankind
miscreant
(adj.; n.) evil; an evil person; villain
miser
(n.) penny pincher, stingy person
mite
(n.) a very small sum of money; very small creature
mitigate
(v.) alleviate; lessen; soothe
modulate
(v.) to regulate or adjust; to vary the pitch
mollify
(v.) to soften; to make less intense
molten
(adj.) melted
moot
(adj.) subject to or open for discussion or debate
mordant
(adj.) cutting; sarcastic
morose
(adj.) moody, despondent
motif
(n.) theme
motility
(n.) spontaneous motion
mundane
(adj.) ordinary; commonplace
munificent
(adj.) giving generously
muse
(v.) to think or speak meditatively
myriad
(n.) a large number
narcissistic
(adj.) egotistical; self-centered; self-love, excessive interest in ones appearance, comfort, abilities, etc.
nascent
(adj.) starting to grow or develop
nautical
(adj.) of the sea; having to do with sailors, ships, or navigation
nebulous
(adj.) unclear or vague
nefarious
(adj.) morally bad; wicked
nefariousness
(adj.) being villainous or wicked
negligence
(n.) carelessness
nemesis
(n.) a person who inflicts just punishment; retribution; a rival
neologism
(n.) giving a new meaning to an old word
neophyte
(n.) beginner; newcomer
nettle
(v.) annoy; irritate
neutral
(adj.) impartial; unbiased
nexus
(n.) a connection
noisome
(adj.) harmful to health; having a foul odor
nostalgic
(adj.) longing for the past; filled with bittersweet memories
nostrum
(n.) a questionable remedy for difficulties
notorious
(adj.) infamous; renowned; having an unfavorable connotation
novel
(adj.) new
noxious
(adj.) harmful to one's health
nugatory
(adj.) trifling; futile; insignificant
nullify
(v.) cancel; invalidate
oaf
(n.) a clumsy, dumb person
obdurate
(adj.) stubborn
obeisance
(n.) a gesture of respect or reverence
obfuscate
(v.) to darken, confuse, bewilder
objective
(adj.; n.) open-minded; impartial; goal
objurgate
(v.) to chide vehemently
obligatory
(adj.) mandatory; necessary; legally or morally binding
obliterate
(v.) destroy completely
obloquy
(n.) widespread condemnation or abuse; disgrace or infamy resulting from this.
obscure
(adj.) not easily understood; dark
obsequious
(adj.) servilely attentive; fawning
obsolete
(adj.) out of date; pass'
obstinate
(adj.) stubborn
obtrude
(v.) to force oneself or one's ideas upon another; to thrust forward; to eject
obtuse
(adj.) dull; greater than 90± but less than 180±; slow to understand or perceive
obviate
(v.) to make unnecessary
occult
(adj.) hidden; beyond human understanding; mystical; mysterious
odious
(adj.) hateful; disgusting
odium
(n.) a hate; the disgrace from a hateful action
oligarchy
(n.) form of government in which the supreme power is placed in the hands of a small, exclusive group.
ominous
(adj.) threatening
omniscient
(adj.) having knowledge of all things
opalescent
(adj.) iridescent
opaque
(adj.) dull; cloudy; non-transparent
opprobrious
(adj.) abusive
optimist
(n.) person who hopes for the best; sees the good side
opulence
(n.) wealth; fortune
ornate
(adj.) elaborate; lavish; decorated
orthodox
(adj.) traditional; accepted
oscillate
(v.) to move back and forth; to have a wavering opinion
ossify
(v.) to turn to bone; to harden
ostensible
(adj.) apparent
ostentatious
(adj.) being showy
ostracize
(v.) to exclude
oust
(v.) drive out; eject
p
(adj.) mocking; cynical
paean
(n.) a song of praise or triumph
pagan
(adj.) polytheistic
painstaking
(adj.) thorough, careful, precise
palatial
(adj.) large and ornate, like a palace
palindrome
(n.) a word or phrase which reads the same backwards and forwards
palliate
(v.) to alleviate or ease pain but not cure; to make appear less serious