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57 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Simile
a comparison using like or as. He’s strong as a bull.
Metaphor
a comparison without the use of like or as, direct comparison. He’s a beast.
Alliteration
repetition of the same or very similar consonant sounds in words that are close together in a poem. The fl and t sound “many a flirt and flutter”
Onomatopoeia
use of a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning. Crackle, pop
Personification
kind of metaphor in which a nonhuman thing or quality is talked about as if it were human. The wind howled.
Lyric
Poetry that does not tell a story but aimed only at expressing a speaker’s emotions or thoughts.
Epic
long story told in elevated language (usually poetry), which relates the great deeds of a larger-than-life hero who embodies the values of a particular society. Odyssey
Blank Verse
In unrhymed iambic pentameter, has the same beat
Free Verse
written without meter or structure. Does not rhyme or have similar beat.
Rhymed couplet
two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme.
Internal rhyme
occurs in the middle of a line.
Irony
contrast or discrepancy between expectation and reality – between what is said and what is really meant, between what is expected to happen and what really does happen, or between what appears to be true and what is really true. Verbal, writer or speaker says one thing but really means something completely different. Situational, when there is a contrast between what would seem appropriate and what really happens or when there is a contradiction between what we expect to happen and what really does take place. Dramatic, when the audience knows something important that a character in a story does not know.
Prose
which does not have the rhythmic qualities or poetry and which tends to be less concentrated in language or ideas
Flashback
scene in a story that interrupts the present action of the plot to flash backward and tell what happened at an earlier time.
Dialogue
when two people speak to each other
Rising Event
series of complications leading to the crisis or turning point
Denouement
the resolution, the ending
Point of View
First Person, a character in the story talks to the audience. I. Second Person, you are telling the story, You. Third Person limited, narrator not involved in story and we are limited on the character like thought. Third Person Omniscient, all knowing.
Run-on sentence
when two different thoughts are in one sentence.
Compound sentence
has two or more independent clauses but no subordinate clauses.
Complex sentence
has one independent clause and at least one subordinate clause. Juliet declared her love for Romeo before she spoke to him.
Compound-complex sentence
contains two or more independent clauses and at least one subordinate clauses.
Subordinate clause
a clause that cannot stand alone. It needs another phrase to be correct.
Prepositional phrase
begins with a preposition and ends with a noun or pronoun that is called the object of the preposition. The sniper ran across the street.
Appositive
a word or phrase appearing next to a noun or pronoun that renames or identifies as the same. Ms. Banchi, my English teacher
Predicate nominative
follows a linking verb and explains or identifies the subject of the verb. The woman who borrows the necklace is she.
Antecedent
the word a pronoun stands for. When Bob was at the game he caught a ball.
Pronoun
a word that takes the place of a noun
Declarative
a sentence that makes a statement
Imperative
makes a request or give a command
Interrogative
asks a question
Exclamatory
expresses strong feeling followed by a !
Direct object
follows an action verb and tells whom or what. Bob destroyed them.
Indirect object
comes before a direct object and tells to whom or to what or for whom or for what. Buddy gave her a kite.
Object of a preposition
comes at the end of a phrase that begins with a preposition. The gift is for him and her.
Divided Quotation
“Ms. Banchi,” Jenn said, “is the meanest teacher ever!”
Direct Address
when you are directly talking to the person
Aesthetic
artistic, pleasing to the eye
Autonomy
a self-governing state, community or group; independent
Bourgeois
person in the middle class
Colloquial
fashion of speech; the way you talk
Contemptuous
feeling contempt; scornful
Diminutive
small in size; small
Facilitate
to make easier
Heresy
going against the majority belief
Indignant
angry
Innate
inherit by birth
Insipid
lacking flavor; dull
Malleable
able to adjust; adaptable
Meticulous
careful; extremely detailed
Plausible
acceptable
Qualm
sudden feeling of sickness
Quantitative
expressed in quantity
Sadistic
cruel
Subsidize
to assist; help
Transcend
pass beyond limits; surpass
Vigilant
careful; attentive