Was Andrew Carnegie A Hero Or Villain Essay

1099 Words 5 Pages
Hero or Villain? Noteworthy. Andrew Carnegie managed to overtake the business world by storm. During the Gilded Age, were the economy grew and the rich flourished, he managed to develop wealth and prosper from steel. Despite his actions being genius, they were far from heroic. He should be considered an eminent business man. Andrew Carnegie, although not a heroic figure, is a legend to the business world due to his innovative pioneering, business techniques, and leadership expertise. Furthermore, Andrew Carnegie was gifted with unique ideas. In 1872, Carnegie seized the opportunity to partner with Henry Bessemer, the inventor of steel, to build a steel mill (Document 1). Carnegie realized that iron didn 't possess the capacity to succeed, …show more content…
Carnegie demonstrated his leadership skills with a survival of the fittest attitude. In “Wealth” he expressed this thoughts on how the best were meant to win and demonstrate their winnings (Document 8). He stated, “the duty for all men of wealth is to set an example of modest living…”(Document 8). Through this mantra Carnegie set out to be the best of his league. Although, he desired to be known for his revolution of the business industry, he needed more. This enabled Carnegie to donate back to foundations. Carnegie’s total donation to various charities was a total of 350,695,653 (Document 9). Andrew Carnegie established these foundations briefly after retiring from the business world. His actions indicate his need to be heard one last time. Carnegie demonstrated leadership throughout these actions because he knew what people wanted to hear/see. He mastered the perception of image and knew had to cultivate his own. As a result of this notion, Andrew Carnegie left his desired legacy for the centuries to …show more content…
According to Merriam-Webster, hero is defined as “a person who is admired for great or brave acts”. Carnegie failed to complete actual heroic actions during his lifetime. For instance, Carnegie ignored his worker’s demands and neglected to sympathize with them. Carnegie’s workers were paid $1.46 for a full 12 hours of brutal work (Document 6). Although that was the average pay in 1892, Andrew Carnegie was not the standard boss. Carnegie earned 92,000 dollars daily (Document 7). On that note Carnegie’s workers were greatly underpaid taking into consideration the success of the business they worked so diligently for. Moreover, one would infer that Carnegie would sympathize with his worker because he once was also poor (Document C). Yet, this inference is obviously wrong. For these reasons, Carnegie cannot be considered heroic. Although many will argue that before his death, foundations were set in place to build libraries and fund education, Carnegie executes this for the image purposes mentioned above. An accurate representation of Andrew Carnegie was depicted by The Saturday Globe (Document 10). Carnegie is shown to have two sides, the one he wanted to be portrayed as and the one he actually was (Document 10.) Yet, this does not diminish his accomplishments in the business world. His innovative thinking of vertical integration, popular demand, etc. could not be faked. Therefore, Carnegie

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