Letters To Alice Comparison

Great Essays
The distinctive contexts of novels that discuss the same subject matter can be accentuated through a comparative study, thus enabling a responder to deepen their understanding of the values presented within these texts. This concept is encapsulated in Jane Austen’s 1813 novel, Pride and Prejudice (Pride) when studied alongside Fay Weldon’s 1984 epistolic text, Letters to Alice on first reading Jane Austen (Letters). The values presented in each text are heightened by each of their contexts, where Austen writes in the Regency era and Weldon during a period of literary analysis transformation. The exploration of the values established by the institution of marriage, the importance of individuality and education induce a thorough comprehension of the texts.

When the underlying reasons of
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Darcy, instead of acquisitive dispositions.

Weldon in Letters highlights the harsh realities of marriage in the Regency era in that women “lived well only by their husbands favour” to avoid imminent poverty. Aunt Fay’s niece, Alice, is encouraged to anticipate a different social environment to come to the realisation of the juxtaposing that, “[marriage] is the stuff of our women’s magazines but it was the stuff of their life”, heightening the social sphere Austen employed, through the hyperbolic contrasting of time periods.
Hence, it is emphasised that during Weldon’s egalitarian society, women were not confined to observing conventions to become married and hence, they should seize opportunities available to avoid being a “dependent”. Therefore, Weldon’s exploration of marriage assists and impacts the responder’s understanding and interpretation of it and the way in which Austen expresses them in Pride compelling the responder to alternate their approach towards the value of

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