Tsarist Autocracy

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“The fundamental reason why the old regime collapsed was the personality and weak leadership of the Tsar.”
To what extent is this statement accurate?

The sovereignty of Nicholas II led to the ultimate collapse and diminishment of autocratic rule in Russia. The statement, “The fundamental reason why the old regime collapsed was the personality and weak leadership of the Tsar,” is significantly accurate as demonstrated through the decisions and responses of the Tsar during and post many events including: bloody Sunday in 1905, the 1905 revolution and Russia’s contribution in World war 1. The Tsar’s significantly poor responses to the events led to Russia’s ultimate recession and deterioration in political, economic and social factors. Nicholas’
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The revolution took place as a result of the strikes within Russia. This placed the country in a social crisis essentially impacting the economy and the deteriorating the Tsar’s image into one hated by the people. The revolts and illegal creations of political parties including the socialist democratic party and the socialist revolutionary party dramatically influenced the Tsar to give the people what they wanted- “give people their civil rights, freedom of speech and press and have all laws confirmed by a state Duma,” (‘my dearest mamma’ Tsar’s letter to his mother). However, despite the detrimental social factors of civil unrest from living conditions as well as political factors leading to a stop in Russia’s economy as a consequence of the Tsar’s previous decisions, he ensured to reassert his autocratic power through the fundamental laws after the dismissal of the first and second dumas that he perceived as ‘radical’. The Tsar clearly wanted to continue having absolute power as depicted in the quote by Fitzpatrick describing the first duma’s suggestion to the Tsar of, “abolition of the death penalty, the resignation of the government, the elimination of the upper house, ministerial responsibility, the confiscation of large estates, the right to strike, equality before the law and the reformation of the whole tax system…” This portrays the people’s …show more content…
This is highlighted thoroughly through the historians and primary sources such as the re-account of Father George Gapon to truly demonstrate how the stubborn and injudicious personality of the Tsar ultimately influenced his weak leadership and decisions politically, economically and socially in the events of Bloody Sunday, the 1905 revolution and world war 1 leading to the rising discontent of the people; forcing him out of autocracy and into his abdication in

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