Satire In Oscar Wilde's The Importance Of Being E

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Comparing Satire “The Importance of Being Earnest” takes place in the Victorian Era. The purpose of Wilde writing a satire about Victorian society was to awaken people. He wanted to let the people understand how ridiculous it was. “As for the particular locality in which the hand-bag was found, a cloak-room at a railway station, might serve to conceal a social indiscretion-has probably, indeed, been used for that purpose before now-but it could hardly be regarded as an assured basis for a recognized position in a good society.” (Wilde, 994). Lady Bracknell was the source of the ridiculousness in Victorian society because the only thing she cared about was social status and how to gain more power. She is very materialistic, and it was very common for people to be …show more content…
He even went to improv camp so he could be better at acting. “I clearly had not played them at improv camp in Wisconsin; here was an opportunity to channel my feelings of disappointment into bravura acting.” (Alford, 996). Even though he tried so hard, after experiencing the work of extra, he realized all the work that he had done was useless. He tried to be serious by basing a character interpretation on a movie prop, but he finally understood all of it was so ridiculous. “I based my character interpretation on that!” (Alford, 998). The more he tried to be serious, the more he seemed ridiculous and silly.

I think the satire “Big Kiss” is more successful. The subtle hints that Alford used in the satire made the story seem more ridiculous. “The Importance of Being Earnest” satirizes the entire Victorian society and the people who follows the rules, but “Big Kiss” only satirizes his job as an extra. In the satire, he clearly wrote about how the extras want to get the director’s attention and do anything to reach their goal. The author wrote this satire from his own perspective based on his experience, which made the satire seem more honest for the

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