Theme Of Faith In Narnia

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In Narnia, as in the Bible, grace is linked to faith. One cannot acquire forgiveness on their own. His own sin is too great and the divine sovereign is too honest for self-justification. One cannot change themselves either. Sinfulness is to grand to overcome on ones’ own. There are some things only Aslan can do, and the only proper human response to these things is faith. As the Beavers in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe tell Peter, it is no good trying to save Mr. Tumnus from the White Witch themselves: "It 's no good, Son of Adam . . . no good your trying... But now that Aslan is on the move... He 'll settle the White Queen all right. It is he, not you, that will save Mr. Tumnus" (73-74).
A fantastic example of grace is illustrated in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. Eustace, the Pevensie children’s
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Bacchus the nymph shows up to perform a "far wilder" dance with his Maenads at the Fords of Beruna (Prince Caspian 207) His dance is productive. It generates a feast including Bacchus 's own specialty, wine: "dark thick ones like syrups of mulberry juice, and clear red ones like red jellies liquefied, and yellow wines and green wines and yellowy-green and greenish-yellow" (205).
The actions of music and dance are metonymy for a life full of playful yet serious endeavors and pleasure is amongst the routine. In his satirical work The Screwtape Letters, Lewis has the demon Screwtape warn his nephew Wormwood: the enemy (God) is no

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