Rosenhan Study Summary

Improved Essays
The Rosenhan Study showed how psychiatric hospitals could not differentiate between actually sick, insane patients from patients who were faking the symptoms and completely sane. Many people have been suspicious of the pharmaceutical industry and believe they will lie and manipulate the public. There are select minorities that believe that many diseases could be cured, but the treatment has not been made public due to the damage it would do to the pharmaceutical industry. In Rosenhan’s study, eight participants with no prior history with any mental disorder were going to try gain admission into twelve psychiatric hospitals. This resulted in all of the participants getting in and getting diagnosed with the following mental disorders: schizophrenia …show more content…
After this experiment, critics asked Rosenhan to administer a similar experiment, but he had to follow their guidelines this time. The psychiatric hospital staff expected to receive “fake” patients due to these guidelines, but there was a slight issue. Of the hundreds of patients he sent for this study, Rosenhan sent no actors who were “faking” this time. The hospital was not able to differentiate the sick patients with the ones that were acting as they accused some patients of being actors although there were none for this part of the study. It made people think if the industry was flawed and innocent people were unnecessarily being labeled and being forced to live with such extreme stigmatizations. Thomas Szasz says that mental disorder diagnoses have been over diagnosed and overblown. Many people who do not have any mental disorder are being forced to take medications and become burdened with the stigmatization of the disorder, he argues. He was anti-psychiatry as he rejected nearly all the ideas that were taught in the field of psychiatry. The study by Rosenhan was a significant study in the 1970s, as it showed how little evidence there was to be needed in order to be considered

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Dsm Pros And Cons

    • 1344 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This was one of the more noble goals, but it was skewed as well. There are now too many mental disorders to shuffle through in the books, and the symptoms drag on and on. It’s almost impossible for a psychiatrist to scan the manuals to help diagnose a patient in a meeting. The DSMs never take into account an individual; it’s always a group. The people in charge of creating the DSMs did it this way because it is easier to publish, but it leads to more problems about grouping people until everyone loses touch with their own piece of normal.…

    • 1344 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since the 1960s, state funded mental institutions have always been less of a concern to the people. After a few studies and the discover of human rights abuse and mass cruelty, state funded mental institutions have changed their methods drastically throughout the years. The various types of abuse that the patients had to endure through were horrifying. Misdiagnosis such as deafness was considered retardation, and the psychiatric would sentence them into the institutions without considering a second option or opinion. The facilities would often intentionally over prescribe pills, and practically overdose their patients.…

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mentally ill people are not locked up in mental health facilities because we don’t have enough in our society, that is why they are being imprisoned. Mental illness is a way for the state to keep authority. Moreover, psychiatry has colluded with the legal system to create the “therapeutic state” (p. 39). Therapeutic states are a system in which disapproved actions, thoughts, and emotions are repressed ("cured") through pseudomedical interventions. In these two videos, we can see how this is played out.…

    • 1026 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Introduction Mental illnesses are some of the least publicly accept illnesses being widely demonized by those who do not understand them. In the past those afflicted with mental illness locked up and hidden away from the public; patients at psychiatric hospitals were treated worst than animals. People with mental illnesses often do not receive the support that those with physical illnesses receive because their afflictions are not externally apparent. There are some who choose to believe that people with mental illnesses are faking and simply just want the attention or that these illnesses can be cured by nothing more than a simple change of minded. Because of society harsh views many individuals with mental illnesses feel ashamed of them self,…

    • 1487 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They are referred to as “useless” and being “all in your head” (Kramer 1) when, in fact, many patients claim that antidepressants help them with their disease or disorder. Some psychologists claim that antidepressants’ disposition will only effectively treats patients with severe depression. It is nearly impossible to constrict the amount of people who use antidepressants to only those with serious depression because people are known to exaggerate their symptoms. This includes, especially, those who unknowingly receive a placebo and show a promising recovery. Antidepressants are used for more than just depression.…

    • 834 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This is evident when you see the unfairness in the spread of funding for mental health compared to general health. The hospitals are known to be very uncared for and the comparison on the amount they are understaffed is immense. Often there are only 2 nurses on a ward filled mentally ill people that need constant care. It seems that society is geared towards helping all people but helping those for whom there is a massive outcry for. A large percentage of people with schizophrenia don’t even look ill so society automatically turns off the need to care for these people even though their illness hinders their life in a way that no other illness does.…

    • 1280 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Insanity Of Addiction

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Social Stigma Social stigma refers to a negative view held by most people towards a unique group of individuals, such as addicts. Society views addiction as a moral failing rather than an illness, further reducing the addict’s willingness to acknowledge his or her addiction and seek treatment. Seemingly, society believes it’s okay to have an illness such as diabetes, but it’s not okay to have the illness of addiction. Despite our progress in so many areas of life (such as moving forward on racial and gender equality, albeit slowly), the social stigma associated with substance abuse has barely made a dent if even a scratch. Even many physicians hold a negative view of the addict.…

    • 1122 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Dr. William McBride noticed that this medication stopped morning sickness so he decided to use it for this secondary purpose on all pregnant patients. The problems began when McBride associated the birth defects of his patients to the medication. The mother’s of the deformed children were given the sedative to stop the morning sickness but they were unaware of the cost of taking this medication. Frances Kelsey, who at the time was a FDA inspector, decided to not allow the use of the product in the USA since there was not substantial information on the drug. She followed a rigid decision making process.…

    • 1156 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Institutions do not get reimbursed because the patients score them low due to not giving them enough for their pain. Now we have another agency saying it is all the hospital physicians fault for giving so many opioids that we have such a high overdose and addiction rate. So now we are developing policies in healthcare of how to not prescribe narcotics to patients. Yet, the policy is still going to stay in effect that you have to treat their pain to their desired level. It isn’t going to change the Press Ganey score if the patient doesn’t get the narcotic they are insisted for their toothache they have had for 3 months, they score us low because we will only give them acetaminophen or ibuprofen for their pain with a order to follow up with the…

    • 1406 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Society thinks in black and white. There are normal people, and there are abnormal people. The normal people are the neurologically typical who can function in regular society, while the abnormal people cannot. These people are usually pushed out of the circles of acceptance and casted as outcasts, or in the case of Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, pushed into the Oregon psychiatric hospital and labeled as “crazy.” However, the men in the institution are not “crazy.” Most of them are simply misfits where the institute provides an escape from their reality and the outside world; while it is neither the best nor healthiest option, it offers the men a sense of purpose and belonging. The Oxford Dictionary lists the definition of crazy as “mentally deranged, especially as manifested in a wild or aggressive way.” Yet, these men are hardly wild, aggressive, or anywhere near deranged.…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays