The Role Of Hockey In Richard Wagamese's Indian Horse

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When facing with challenges, people deal with problems in different ways. It is easy at times to just ignore these difficulties. However in order to really overcome an obstacle, one has to face and deal with it. Indian Horse by Richard Wagamese is the story of Saul Indian Horse, an Ojibway whose life transects the deep valleys of residential schools and substance abuse as well as the highest peak of minor-league hockey. Saul uses hockey as a way of escaping his past traumatic experiences as a child and with residential schools, and after he stops playing hockey he takes to liquor in order to forget his problems.
As a child growing up and enduring the harsh system of residential schools, playing hockey seemed to alleviate the fact of where he was and help him face reality. Saul uses hockey as a major escape route and as he plays hockey he stops being reserved and becomes livelier. Hockey helps him forget about his problems. For instance, he said that the game kept him from remembering; that as long as he could escape into it, he could fly away (Wagamese 199). Whenever Saul plays hockey he
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He uses hockey as a way of escaping from his traumatic experiences as a child, and after he stops playing hockey he takes to liquor in order to forget his problems. Hockey serves as Saul’s purpose in life for a brief moment as he felt it sustain him from his past and to a prosperous environment with The Moose. However, Saul’s brutal journey through the racist ranks of minor-league hockey led him into an alcohol-ravaged adulthood and out of his hockey career. Using alcohol as his escape turns out being a terrible choice for Saul. He doesn’t try solving problems, instead he runs away from them. Eventually it results in him pretending to be someone who he wasn't. If Saul only sought after people who loved him instead of alcohol, he would have been freed from his past that was bringing him

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