Grandfather Teachings In Richard Wagamese's Indian Horse

Improved Essays
While reading Richard Wagamese’s book Indian Horse, many, if not all seven Grandfather Teachings were said or explained during the novel. Even though, Saul Indian Horse had a tragic beginning in life, as he grew older he became aware of what happened in his past and in many ways that made him a lot wiser. However, Wagamese showed these three Grandfather’s teachings and their importance some more than the rest of them; being love, wisdom and truth.
One of the most important lessons that Saul had to learn in Wagameses’s book Indian Horse was love. He had learned to love hockey, which in his younger years it was his escape of his haunted memories made by Father Leboutilier and the cruel punishments other children received. “When I hit the ice
…show more content…
He was even introduced to them before he arrived to St Jerome's because his parents went to a residential school themselves. Like his grandmother mentioned in the early pages of the book “That school gave you words that do not apply to us”(Wagamese 26). Which is true, the school took his parents’ roots away and taught them to follow a different religion other than their spiritual ways, leaving their history behind and making them forget where they came from. His parents choose to live in the words of Jesus Christ even when they got back to their reserve, instead of listening to their own Elders words and teachings. That had an effect on Saul when he was little because when his brother Benjamin died at God’s Lake after escaping the residential school with TB his parents wanted to have him buried by the church. Whereas Saul’s grandmother wanted to do it the traditional way that their family did things. Saul learned later that his grandmother meant well for the sake of their roots. In Saul’s case this had happened to him, he was sent to a residential school and managed to have a family get him out of there. He had enough courage in him to want to learn the truth and to relearn his history by taking steps and glances back into his past. “I went back to learn the truth, I had discovered locked up deep inside of me. I went back because I wanted to learn how to deal with it without drinking. …show more content…
In particular, Saul Indian Horse learned love, wisdom and truth. These are the teachings that carried him on throughout the novel and kept him moving forward it kept him together, even during the hardest of times and he remembered to turn on the light. That was how Saul Indian Horse became whole

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Last Lecture is a novel about a boy/man named Randy Pausch who grew up in Pittsburgh, but then had to move to Virginia because he found out he had pancreatic cancer. When Randy discovered that he had cancer his decisions no longer were only for him, but were also for his family. In this novel the readers learn really what Randy was about and what he lived for. Rather than Randy just making this novel because he wanted people to mourn over him having cancer, Randy made this novel because he wanted his kids and others to grow up achieving their childhood dreams and to not waste anytime doing so. Randy’s techniques for writing this novel is unique because the readers weren't sorry for Randy when reading this novel, they actually were inspired…

    • 1072 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He gave his last lecture on September 18, 2007, it was entitled “Really achieving your Childhood Dreams”. He wanted to leave it as a message for his children to have a memory of his. Also, he tried to spend as much time with his children as he could. Sadly, he passed away on July 25, 2008 in his home in Chesapeake, VA. Overall, this teaches many things that are valuable in life and helped me realize things that I previously hadn’t known before reading it.…

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I then asked him about his biggest achievement in life, and he gave me an interesting response: becoming a man. Despite his numerous achievements in school and in hockey, Tyler told me that being able to mature and taking responsibility for himself have really changed him for the better. The next question, however, was the one that really made me learn about his setbacks. I asked him if there was a life experience that affected him. That’s when he brought up his recent bout with myocarditis, which I later learned was heart inflammation.…

    • 1302 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I want to bring them joy I found; the speed, the grace, the strength and the beauty of the game” (212). If it weren’t for the Kellys’ support and love, Saul would not be able to turn his life around and start on a new path. The game of hockey affects Saul’s life in more than one positive way. It offers him salvation, it forces him to confront the racism he encounters and provides him with a forever family. Despite his traumatic past Saul continues to move forward and spread the love of hockey and positivity to young indigenous youth.…

    • 1043 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Simmie wanted to tell the story of how John Wilson really felt , and how he betrayed his first wife by not loving her back the way she did, and to not only tell about John Wilsons bad decisions but to tell Pollys side, to share both of their story. Lois Simmie connected herself to the story, her passion for the story lead her to accomplish the book on the anniversary when the real story ended on April 23…

    • 799 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Great Essays

    Years later, he abused his wife and kids, and his wife divorced him, but just when he was at his low, he turned back to his roots through the help of other Native Americans. He confronted his identity as a past. Woodrow is now, “a treasured elder and Haida story keeper, he utilizes his education and his culture to help others transform abuses and anger by exploring their own heritage.” (Transcending”) Accepting his past has allowed Woodrow to overcome his anger and gave him insight into his own cultural identity. His ancestral history was a large part of his identity, and when that was not acknowledged by his teacher, he felt the discrimination from the past. Until other Native Americans helped him discover…

    • 1592 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Saul uses hockey as a way of escaping his past traumatic experiences as a child and with residential schools, and after he stops playing hockey he takes to liquor in order to forget his problems. As a child growing up and enduring the harsh system of residential schools, playing hockey seemed to alleviate the fact of where he was and help him face reality. Saul uses hockey as a major escape route and as he plays hockey he stops being reserved and becomes livelier. Hockey helps him forget about his problems. For instance, he said that the game kept him from remembering; that as long as he could escape into it, he could fly away (Wagamese 199).…

    • 715 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The introduction of hockey in the novel sheds light on the sensation of freedom the boys felt once on the ice. Saul often refers to the feeling of escape he feels when on the ice and it helps him ultimately escape St Jerome’s residential school. Hockey is also used as a means to illustrate Canadian’s attitude towards natives and Saul explains the racism and the set backs it causes for native players both on and off the ice. An example that illustrates this clearly is when Saul is kicked off the midget team for being too good and outplaying the white kids who’s parents felt like their kids weren’t getting enough play time over a native. This racism makes it very hard for native players to develop skills and even harder for them to progress to a higher level of professional hockey.…

    • 849 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In Indian Horse, Saul seeks to find a sense of belongingness, as his experiences from the residential school leave him robbed of it. When Saul begins to play hockey with the Moose, he feels like he has found belongingness once again. Eventually Saul’s hockey career falls apart due to the constant racism he faces, which detaches him from everything: “No matter what I did, I remained the outsider” (162). Throughout Saul’s journey, he experiences both community and utter isolation. The residential school in the beginning fills Saul with solitude, but he is able to find himself being wanted and acknowledged not long after.…

    • 1100 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Essay On Mission Journey

    • 2073 Words
    • 9 Pages

    I grew up going to church with my parents. My earliest memories are from hanging around the church in Wednesday nights and Sunday mornings. Growing up, I would hear about this Jesus guy and I would ask questions about him. Hearing about the resurrection was amazing to me and I found it very interesting that he would die for the bad things I did. It was during a Vacation Bible School that I realized that I needed a savior to forgive me of my sins and the only way I could see this happening was by asking God to forgive me and believe in him and his son, Jesus.…

    • 2073 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays