Egyptian Relationship

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F ollowing Alexander the Great’s conquest of Egypt in 332B.C.E. the history of Alexandrian Jews began. While native Egyptian’s, Greeks, Phrygians, Boeotians and Cilicians resided alongside the Jews the Roman’s are of particular interest. Their once peaceful relationship changed course resulting in the destruction of Alexandrian Jews in 117C.E. This article focuses on the relationship between Jews and Romans in Alexandria looking at their, economic, religious, political and civil relations. With careful consideration of primary evidence as well as secondary, the nature of their relations can be better understood.
Interestingly, there is little research on the Roman and Jewish relationship in Alexandria. It is for this very reason the need
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With what’s available, the nature of evidence must be carefully considered as the sources predominately come from Greek or Roman origin. With this in mind, history dictates that the Greeks and Egyptian’s resented the Jews, a strong influence in the widespread anti-Semitism for reasons not quite known. With a strong sense of hostility between these communities, authors tended to focus on this aspect limiting evidence concerning Romans and Jews. What’s more, Greek affairs heavily influenced the Romans permeating their prejudices evident in the works of Tacitus , Hecataeus of Abdera and Apion . The main Jewish writer, who can provide details on the relations of Jews and Romans, is Philo of Alexandria. His high status in Alexandria already suggests Jews were able to secure respected positions. While his works may not put Jews in bad light his intentions again must be considered. Remaining critical of writers hidden agendas is of essence when looking into the Roman and Jewish …show more content…
Therefore, discussions relating to other communities which indirectly involved the Romans like those of the Greeks and Egyptian’s will also be included. Sources at the time contained bias in the portrayal of Jews. Across the Roman Empire, Jews were the minority and often persecuted. As the Roman Empire was already showing signs of hostility it will also be taken into account when deciphering the relationship of that in Alexandria. On the contrary certain emperors and governments showed little or no animosity towards the Jews evident in the rule of Julius Caesar, Augustus and Herod the Great. Evidently, some strongly opposed the Jews while others did not mind their presence. Both views in the Greek/Roman world present an issue of why they were disliked and whether these views also affected those in Alexandria. It can be safe to say this was the case which will also give some context to the condition in Alexandria between Jews and Romans from 30B.C.E. to 117C.E. Understanding how they interacted with each other is the aim however, again with the lack of sources and subjective works answers may be difficult to conclude. An insight into their relationship is more likely as the article will

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