Roman Government Structure

Improved Essays
The Ancient Roman government structure is something that was unique to civilizations at this time. The Romans were trying to be different and better than the civilizations that had come before them. The book Rome, the Greek World, and the East: Government, Society, and Culture in the Roman Empire examines the differences between the Romans to the other successful civilizations that had come before them. This provides a good insight into why the Roman model was considered special and unique from the rest of the world. It also theorizes on what the Romans wished to embody as they structured their empire. In the book, The Construction of Authority in Ancient Rome and Byzantium: The Rhetoric of Empire by Sarolta Takacs, the author examines how …show more content…
The author of this journal article is Fergus Millar who is noted to be one of the leading historians in the studies of the ancient worlds. In his multiple publications, he focused on the roman republic and empire and what made it different economically, socially and politically.
The government structure was an institution that put an emphasis on the community’s involvement. In the book Ancient Rome, the author William Dunstan breaks down how the system was split into a variety of parts that collectively worked together to ensure that the republic of Rome functioned properly. The author is professor at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and has focused his career on the study of cultural history. In his books, he has focused primarily on the civilizations of ancient times and how they lived their lives at that time. Using the government system as a model, the founding fathers within the United States created a democracy in the states that they hoped would be long-lasting and efficient. In the book, Jeffersonian America: Rome Reborn on Western Shores: Historical Imagination and the Creation of the American Republic, the author examines the thought process that the founding fathers, in particular
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The aspects were not exactly the same but used a model for the Americans to put their twists on them. This theory is examined in the book Perils of Empire: The Roman Republic and the American Republic. The author of this book argues that the similarities between the Roman Republic and America since its founding is remarkably similar. However, both needed to individual characteristics that helped that be successful during their time periods. By outlining the institutions of military, government, and society of both, the author is able to see what effects the parallels between the two had on their own successes. This theory is also examined in the journal article “Ancient Rome and Modern America Reconsidered” by Mason Hammond. Hammond was a respected scholar who worked at the University and Harvard. He focused his studies and his published books on studying Rome and the empire that it constructed. In the journal article, “Pax Romana/Pax Americana: Perceptions of Rome in American Political Culture” the author puts down the theory of parallels claiming that they do not exist. According to this article, they parallels only come about due to misrepresentations in

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