Woman's Suffrage Movement

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Suffrage means to have the right to vote in political elections. The concept was an ideal means for women throughout history, especially for women between late 1700’s and early 1900’s. Women suffrage had long been publicized to society since the 1700’s by Mary Wollstonecraft in 1792 (Scholastics), and many other events or activities, led to the ratification of the 19th amendment. At the same time, the right for African Americans suffrage was also an approach. Through many generations of African Americans, the 15th amendment was passed by congress on February 3, 1870, which granted African American males to vote. In the 1820’s the role of a woman’s was to stay home and be good wives and mothers, which is known as Woman’s Sphere introduced …show more content…
Anthony, who was the president of this organization (History). The suffragists’ approaches had transformed to a whole new aspect, arguing that women and men were “created equal”, and the new generation argued that they could create a “maternal commonwealth” (History); thus, will expand equality. This single argument served to political agendas; such as the Temperance advocates- who argued for woman equality, movement against the ban of alcohol, etc. - and many middle class white people concurred with this agenda. The National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), and the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA), arose to fight for the ratification of the 15th amendment, The National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) planned on creating a federal constitutional Amendment that would give women the right to vote. At the same time, abolitionists Henry Blackwell and Lucy Stone founded the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). This group supported the 15th Amendment, but feared that it may not pass if it included voting rights for women (History). Even if the two organizations, (NWSA) and (AWSA) did not agree with the terms of the 15th Amendment, in 1891, there was a victory for women voting rights for women who were 21 and older, granted by the Wyoming …show more content…
The Amendment elevated to the states for ratification. By March of 1919, thirty-five states approved the Amendment (History). There were several states in the Southern region who were opposed to the Amendment, such as: Georgia, Alabama, Maryland, South Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina, and other states. However, the vote of Tennessee created a wider margin for women to achieve their goal for woman voting rights. Tennessee voted on August 18, 1920, for ratification of the 19th Amendment. The vote from Tennessee’s state legislators put the state in a 48-48 tie; thus, giving the final decision to a representative named Harry T. Burns. Burns was against the 19th Amendment, but his mother convinced him to change his mind. With Burns final vote, the 19th Amendment was ratified, and allowed women to vote in the 1920’s election. On November 2nd 1920, many women were voted in the elections. There were more than 8 million in the U.S who voted for the first time (History). Nonetheless, it still took over 60 years for the other remaining states, who were against the ratification of the 19th Amendment, to change their minds. On March 22, 1984, the final state of Mississippi ratified the 19th Amendment (History). Thus, this allowed women to finally have the same voting opportunity as

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