The Impact Of The Great Migration Movement

Superior Essays
The Great Migration was a time when six million African Americans relocated from the South to the North for economic prosperity. At the time, African Americans were trying to flee the troubles of racism in the South as well as the oppressive conditions. With the occurrence of World War I, many felt that they could pursue a better life in the North. In turn, urban communities, such as Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and New York, saw their black population rise up to 20 percent between 1910 and 1930. Overall, the Great Migration was one of the largest mass movements America has ever seen.
During the early years of 1900, African American living conditions were said to be far from ideal. Not too long after the Civil War, many African Americans
…show more content…
At this time, it was the nations leading African American newspaper. Many job opportunities were advertised in this newspaper but so were black social issues. Whenever lynchings occurred, they were often discussed in the Chicago Defender. After a number of serious incidents, the Defender’s publisher, Robert Abbot, was convinced that the Migration was an effective tactic for hurting the white South and a real opportunity for African Americans to live in freedom (The Atlantic). In fact, after seeing the impact on the southern economy, Abbot embraced the movement, calling it a “Second Emancipation” (The …show more content…
After working in the North for a while, these workers found that the money they were earning was far too little. With a higher cost of living, high rents became troublesome (Sonneborn). Blacks were often forced out of areas where whites were living and into all-black neighborhoods (Sonneborn). These neighborhoods were more in the oldest, most dilapidated parts of town (Sonneborn). If a black attempted to buy a home in one of the white neighborhoods, they often risked becoming a target of violence (Sonneborn). Furthermore, landlords eventually divided apartments into smaller and smaller units. Because of the high demand for housing, they were also able to charge higher rents (Sonneborn).
Looking back, the Great Migration was both a positive and a negative era. Fortunately, African Americans were able to find jobs and homes even though they were not the best. However, this was definitely a huge milestone in American history. American was once a country who did not even view African Americans as humans. For whites to hire and assist blacks during this time is actually amazing. It was a huge step that eventually lead our country to truly be the United

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The Black Press Analysis

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This false image of progressive treatment drove people to find employment in the North. Because the Chicago Defender was a major voice for African Americans, its followers took the advice seriously. The press was as powerful enough as to make major life decisions for some people. Needless to say, the southern economy declined even further than it was after the Civil War. Southerners despised blacks but depended on them for the backbone of their economy.…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The statement that “the Civil Rights Movement [CRM]…owed absolutely to African Americans’ experience in World War [2]” is not at all true. World War 2 may have accelerated the growth of the movement, but it was not the only factor that caused Blacks in the US to begin to demand for civil rights. The Great Depression and First Great Migration allowed for World War 2 to be very significant in the lives of Black people. The war helped foster the Movement because its end allowed for a Black middle class to emerge and Black war veterans were more determined than ever to fight for equality. While all of these things are true, it is also true that many Blacks had been fighting for civil rights for decades, such as those with the NAACP, and younger…

    • 1589 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Great Migration Causes

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Great Migration was the movement of many African American citizens of the United States to seek better lives. The migration of blacks was caused by many natural and manmade crises. The Dust Bowl, the Great Depression, living conditions for blacks, and racism in the south were key influences in causing the Great Migration. This movement of blacks lasted a large part of the twentieth century with only a portion of occurring from 1910-1930, but still yielding over one million blacks moving north in those 20 years (Candaele 7). This affected the north and south alike, increasing the population in the north drastically, and decreasing the southern population.…

    • 1136 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    From 1915 to 1921, somewhere clost to 700,000 African Americans left the South in search of better jobs and more opportunities. Other factors including the boll weevil and the dominance of Jim Crow in the South undeniably contributed to this Great Migration; however, writing in 1918, the African American historian, CG Woodson, notes, “Within the last two years there has been a steady of stream of Negroes into the North in such large numbers as to overshadow in its results all other movements of the kind in the United States.” This was a direct result of declining European immigration sparked by the beginning of the Great War as Northern factories looked to replace the cheap labor that was being lost. Moreover, when millions of black and white American soldiers were mobilized beginning in 1917, this created even more vacancies to be filled. This opportunity to escape to the “promised land” was heralded by African Americans who had already left the South and African American newspapers like Chicago’s The Defender which published a poem in 1916 encouraging African Americans to “bid the South goodbye” as there were “no Crackers North to slap your mother…nor to hang you to a…

    • 1134 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Each one of these factors had a negative impact on the African American community. It forced them into poverty stricken areas, and did not let them out, even if the families could afford it. It took enormous effort for African American families to buy houses in the suburbs. Yet, citizens also benefited from these factors, and those that did not face racial discrimination were able to move into better housing communities or have their own house. The same people benefited from Keynesianism - they were receiving more job related rights due to unions, like higher wages.…

    • 973 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The loans greatly impacted the home ownership market in the United States and lead to the rise of suburbs across the United States. Many soldiers from WWII were in a great position to succeed in life with a college degree and a home. But for African Americans, many could not take advantage of the loan benefits. Many African Americans found it hard to own a home because of a practice called redlining. Red lining is the practice in which real estate agents refuse to sell and give out loans to minorities in certain areas.…

    • 1758 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Many of the new immigrants in the northern part of the United States were African American due the past racial prejudice that they faced in the south where it was common to be spiteful of the now free lower class Afro Americans. Racial tensions in the South and the employment boom after World War I caused a mass diaspora; over 750,000 black Americans left the South for Northern urban centers. Between 1910 and 1930, 1.6 million people moved from the rural south to northern industrial cities. (Goggin) Factory jobs were readily available to those seeking work though many blacks were turned away due to the “Last Hired First Fired” mentality of the Great Depression. So significant was this shift in population that it is now referred to as the "Great Migration."…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    The quality of life in Harlem were not appealing to the second generation of the white residents. As the population increased rapidly the city passed tax exemption to “spur new construction” in the Upper Manhattan areas. The housing conditions began to get worse in the 1920s as the white landlords stopped taking care of their properties. Harlem emerged as a slum because of high cost of living, rent increased rapidly due to housing shortage and influx of negro migration. The Harlemites were forced to pay high rent because no other parts of the city was as welcoming as Harlem for them.…

    • 1613 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This evolution from slave to land owner symbolizes the social progress African Americans were able to make as a race. Despite the many who were doing well in this new America, there were still some who were struggling, such as de facto serfs who worked in fear because their “landowners [told] them if they move[d] off his land he [would] have them put in jail or [he] threatened bodily harm” (Freedom). This adversity was essentially slavery by another name and it resulted in the fear and suffering of many African American people. The sense of superiority the white Americans thought they had over African Americans made it difficult for African American people to grow in society. Nevertheless, there were still African Americans who were able to find their place in society the way Boy Willie planned…

    • 1016 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Over the years, black Detroiters gained more wealth and in the 1950’s civil rights organizations were created. These organizations demanded integrated housing. As blacks saved money to buy homes in otherwise homogeneous white neighborhoods, whites became increasingly fearful. “Both their economic interests and their communal identities were threatened,” Sugrue writes on page 214 of his book. Housing was the most vital asset to any Detroiters life, white or black.…

    • 1132 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays