The Ethical Views Of Aristotle And Plato's Desire For Happiness

Improved Essays
1) God has placed the desire for happiness in the human heart. The desire for happiness is connected with ethics and morality. All ethical theories insist that ethics is after the good.
Plato says that nowhere do we find good, we only find good things. Like beauty; it can be found in things but you cannot find beauty itself. Plato said that reason finds the good that pervades everything. The highest pursuit in life is to contemplate the good. The closest we come to the good is in contemplation. As philosophers, by contemplating the good they are also closest to the good. They 're happy because they know how to act in accordance with beliefs. They make true choices about the value and worth of their actions, thus resulting in happiness. Plato fought against “sophists” who claimed that there was no truth, only opinion, which is ruled by basic needs and desires rather than reason. Plato argued that it is through reason that we find the good.
Aristotle said that all people aspire to some good and all seek to be happy. The search for the good deals with acting intelligently rather than following one’s inclinations (sensual pleasures). According to Aristotle, the good is to be found in God,
…show more content…
The good as advertised is a life of wants and needs, it has to do with having all the new and best things. To achieve the good life you need, a nice house, the money, the power, sex it is very materialistic. Whereas according to Christian ethics the good life has to do the other and meet moral standards. It has to do with you becoming happy and realizing that the happiness comes from doing the right thing. The Christian look at the good life is the polar opposite of the way advertisers would have you believe. The Christian perspective is that others bring us to the good life whereas the social belief has become that get things for yourself will make you happy and bring you to happiness in

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    He believed in two different states that each person has; the Good and the End (“Moral Philosophy”). When describing the Good, Socrates explains that people unconsciously do things that make them happy and that physical objects make one feel satisfied at the same time (“Moral Philosophy”). The whole idea of the Good is that humans act in a positive way and that they just want to live a happy and meaningful life (Moral Philosophy”). Happiness is the one thing all humans want to have in their lives and the Good is that explanation. The End is the other idea Socrates had and goes along with the Good.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It is for our soul to have life and for it to be filled with happiness. It’s an active life that has it with rational principals. Going back to Kant, and him talking about good will, to me basically with having good will I could be laying down and not doing anything, but to contain me still having good will. Kant went logically wrong about his view on good because to him, the human well-being “happiness are two different independent point of views. Kant’s ethical goal is about following the principals, he believed there was a supreme principal for morality and referred it to the categorical Imperative, which were imperative, hypothetical, and categorical imperatives.…

    • 864 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    They both believed that the purpose of human actions was to be happy, which would lead to a good life. For Aristotle, he believed that we strive towards goals in order to find happiness (telos). He also believed that nobody pursues happiness for the sake of something else. Therefore, Aristotle concluded that happiness makes life worthwhile. For Epicurus, he believed that human pleasure was the ultimate happiness.…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Accordingly, human beings differ from other kinds of materials in that they have the power to understand and reason. Since the power of reason is the specific perfection of human beings, they attain their ultimate perfection and the state of happiness by reasoning activities and activities in accord to reason. He rejects any contention that human happiness consists of material goods, although some like a sound body and moderate wealth are necessary for life happiness. Aquinas believes that human happiness is a soul condition produced by activities of reason and other human activities in this life in accord with reason. In these points Aquinas is in basic agreement with Aristotle.…

    • 2010 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mill used utilitarianism as a basis for ethics and he argued that we already do use utilitarianism as a moral standard. To Mill an action is right if it promotes happiness and it is wrong if it reverse happiness. Kant on the other hand bases his view of ethics on good will rather than the outcomes of happiness. As we read, utilitarianism focuses on outcomes of happiness, here we can concluded that it is based on ends, not on means or intentions. I do not totally agree with this however, a person could intend something bad and wrong but in the end, end up causing great happiness.…

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Bertrand Russell once stated that, “The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge”. In Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle creates the concept of a good life that humans should try to acquire. But Aristotle’s concept of a good life is unattainable by humans. He expresses that the ultimate human goal is happiness, but complete happiness is unattainable. He then describes the pivotal role of virtue in the concept of happiness and without virtue one cannot obtain happiness.…

    • 905 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Kant and Aristotle are both philosophers who have different views about the highest human good and morality. Kant believes the only thing perfectly good is the good will (Haber 1993, 61). It is independent of other influences and acts in accordance with duty. The good will is intrinsically good, good without qualification. However, that is not to say everything a human does is done with good will, hence why it is based off duty.…

    • 1180 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle argues that happiness is the ultimate good that we strive to attain. He begins by reasoning that either we desire each good for the sake of another, that is, every good is but means to achieve another good, or that we desire at least one good for its own sake and for this good alone we desire others. He refutes the first claim of the premise by stating that, ‘if we choose everything for the sake of something else”, consequently, “the result will lead to a pointless and ineffectual infinite progression” (Aristotle, 4). Naturally, given the erroneous nature of the first claim, Aristotle agrees with the second claim that there is, at least, one good in which we desire for its own sake. In order to desire a…

    • 1409 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In distinguishing the functions in each of Aristotle’s arguments, it elicits the belief in man’s responsibility to further improve the self to attain a life enriched in goodness. In turn, this goodness then establishes a happy life. However, it is not proven that the ultimate ends lies within happiness. Instead, it is approximated that human life benefits from this. The science of politics promotes moral value, and is exercised with substantiating goodness in…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Within the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle focuses on his detailed definition of happiness in order to know the good for humans and how to achieve it. With this, he figures out that happiness or Eudaimonia, is the final and self-sufficient end of human action. In order to understand why humans strive for this good, Aristotle discovers their function which is activity of the human soul with the “sense of possessing reason and exercising thought” (Aristotle, I.7). These are the only aspects that separate us from other species. Additionally, this activity of the soul must be good that exhibits virtue as excellent states of character (Aristotle, I.7).…

    • 1229 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays