Enlightenment Influence On Christianity

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The Enlightenment period was disastrous for the Church, as skepticism rose in the scientific community; the ecclesiastics struggled to explain the inconsistencies in the doctrines of Christianity and its many diverging theories. Under the fire of the Enlightenment, the Devil lost all credibility and almost disappeared as progress were made in multiple fields of science; to cope with the rising skepticism, Christianity had to adapt and change its outdated traditions which ultimately was more devastating than helpful. When mentioning the Enlightenment one always think of the great philosophers first but it was not only the philosophers such a Emmanuel Kant, Voltaire and Jean Jacques Rousseau that undermined the Church but also the advancements …show more content…
Unfortunately, it backfired greatly due to the lack of positive evidences and the many contradictory principles that could not be reconciled. Christianity simply could not be thought of scientifically, as the Church stated, God is all-powerful thus he cannot be confined to the laws of nature that we know of. The scientific context only served to highlight the flaws of Christianity, which skeptics immediately used to discredit the Christian community’s beliefs. To make-up for those flaws, the Church tried to erase the Devil, thus removing the contradiction of good and evil within God. However, by doing so, ecclesiastics had to build a complex argumentation to avoid mention the principle of the Devil and became lost in it, creating more confusion than clarification. Additionally, it meant that God was now responsible for evil, a theory that thinkers had been trying to discredit since the beginning of the religion. Despite all their efforts to maintain Christianity afloat, it just could not be done, skeptics soon had the upper hand and Satan bite the dust; the Devil suffered the blunt of the attacks as people began to think that evil came directly from humanity and not from an external source tempting the

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