The Dystopian Society In George Orwell's 1984

1599 Words 7 Pages
People claim that eyes in a picture tend to follow their every step, but perhaps one day they realize that they might really be real eyes. George Orwell’s science-fiction novel, 1984, introduces the character known as Winston who struggles with accepting the surroundings presented to him in the dystopian society of Oceania. Winston notices how the government, the Party, utilizes its resources as to watch upon the people through telescreen, drone, and even children, causing Winston to continuously worry whether or not he behaves “well”. He later notes the irony behind the jobs of the four Ministries in that each of them conduct tasks that completely void their purpose, such as how the Ministry of Truth alters the truth and how the Ministry …show more content…
The author wrote 1984 in hopes that people will become aware of the awful the ways of communistic government, being that he created the book during the time in which Russia, under Stalin’s lead, attempted to spread its political values. Orwell correctly predicted that the government of the future attempting to control its citizens through the use of technology and people, as well as altering information in order to make it adhere to their standards. In regards to the surplus of evidence in George Orwell’s 1984, the evidence confirms that this dystopian society differs from our world because our government 's principles and laws contradict one another. Contrasting our world, Winston’s notes that Katherine agreed to marry him purely for the purposes of “‘making a baby’ and the other was [their] ‘duty to the Party’” (Orwell 67). Not a treasured relationship, the government decrees that marriage in Winston’s world cannot possess love, physical, nor …show more content…
While in his secret home in the middle of the proles town, Winston lays besides Julia, but suddenly hears a distant voice mimicking their words and realizes where it came from when “[t]he picture [behind them] f[e]ll … to the floor, uncovering the telescreen behind it[, and claimed that ‘n]ow [it] could see [them]’” (Orwell 222). Winston and Julia feel safe while in their far away hideout, however when they masked telescreen becomes apparent to them, they realize how the government actually created a false sense of safety so that they openly revealed their most hidden desires. Even though our government claims that they do not interfere with our private lives, recent evidence reveals that modern government attempts to hack into the phones of all citizens in order to detect any unlawful activity through the use of opening all private manners such as emails, text messages, and even phone calls. Also, people like the “NPR and CIR [have access to a large amount of] private data that [they can] obtain … even without court approval [just by using the internet]” (Schulz and Zwerdling 2), which makes it prevalent that they too inserted a false sense of independence and safety from the government when the reality actually spots them watching over our every move. In addition to intervening in the private lives of

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