Jane Eyre Theme Of Love Essay

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Love is one of the most overused words in society. It has become so warped from its original meaning that it is used to describe how one feels towards a person and how much he loves his favorite movie. The two extremes often leave one wondering what love really is. By observing examples in Jane Eyre of what love is not, what love is, and how Jane’s view of love changes all throughout the novel , one can see how beautiful the bond of love truly is. First, since the word love is misinterpreted, one must look and see how it has been wrongly portrayed. Love is not looking to please others. At the beginning of the novel Jane asks, “Why could I never please? Why was it useless to try to win anyone’s favor?”(Bronte 42) And the answer to her question is that love is not something to obtain or earn, but it is a gift! If someone tried to reach the standards that people set, they would never be good enough. Next, love is not fake. Jane felt the need to hide who she was internally with St. John because she did not think she would be given affection without conforming to his standards for her. Jane states, “he acquired a certain influence over me that took away my liberty of mind.”(Bronte 1468) She felt like her mind was a “rayless dungeon”(Bronte 1488), which she could not escape. Love is not a …show more content…
Love is not something that can be earned, but is freely given. Love is willing to go above and beyond the call of duty in all circumstances. And God is love, without Him love would not be possible. Clearly, the bond of love is something that is difficult to grasp, unless one has felt true love that comes from God. Jane said it best, “all my heart is yours: it belongs to you”(Bronte 1645), but that is only valid when one gives their heart fully to the

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