The Core Concept Of Meritocracy In Society

753 Words 4 Pages
Meritocracy is an idealistic theory that may someday be achieved. The core concept of meritocracy that suggest society, specifically institutions should be government by intellectual citizens is logical, however the reality does not entirely reflect tis model because of the strong relationship between socioeconomic status and opportunities that drive the privileged classes to thrive/prosper. However, the practice of objectively using merit to admit students within school is not entirely sound. However, it is arguable that this like many other circumstances in a capitalistic society wills not ever manufacture a ‘fair playing ground’ for applicants in both academia and in the real world. Irrefutably, there will always be a division between classes, …show more content…
Nonetheless, financially strained citizens can excel, but Hayes highlights that when they do, they often rise from their social class leaving those of this class overlooked and marginalized. Hayes states, “against what might happen, those who are judged to have merit of a particular kind harden into a new social class without room in it for others” (Hayes, 2012, p. 42); when deconstructing the diction of this quote the emphasis of a ‘particular kind’ suggests the is a social hierarchy, and economic association with intellectuals that elevates their status from society imposing a kind of “hardening” to assimilate when those are able to surpass the obstacles of our capitalistic society and climb the social …show more content…
This journal explores the issues that arise when certain standardized objective tests are introduced to adhere to fairness and equal opportunity in contrast to subjective qualifications that can assist with one’s acceptance into a post secondary education such as: recommendations, resumes, writing samples, parental legacies and interviews (Hayes, 2012, p. 34). For example, Hayes investigates the process Hunter College High School utilizes to objectively test approximately 3000-4000 candidates at age eleven, to later only select 185 students admission. In addition, about forty-five percent of students throughout Manhattan test into Hunter Elementary School in the first grade automatically gain entrance into the high school (Hayes, 2012, pg. 32). Thus, the process does not demonstrate merit or equal opportunity at all, but rather disguises the inequality to enable wealthy parents to invest in their children’s future, where as those who do not have the financial means are less likely to receive enrollment. In addition, even though this process is partially objective the young age of testing minimizes those, the working class, who do not have the time or funds to invest their time and money into their children’s education are sabotaged as well. The mere reality is that Hunter; alongside many other prestigious privatized schools do

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