That Long Silence Analysis

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The term ‘tradition’ is a comprehensive one and it includes all social conventions, cultural practices, religious faiths, familial and familiar relationships. We come to know that the consistent burden of traditional authority generates a rebellion against the organized forces of oppression and injustice done to the women in the patriarchal society. Deshpande promotes the idea that women must try to come out of their suppressed roles. My paper analyses the conflict of tradition and modernity with special reference to her novels That Long Silence, The Dark Holds No Terrors, Roots and Shadows and A Matter of Time respectively. Deshpande’s women are role models of the new society who thirst for modernity elevation and up gradation. Here modern …show more content…
She was invariably caught in the struggle between the traditional and the modern mode of thinking and the living. ‘Jaya’ the heroine in That Long Silence gets troubles in marriage with her husband ‘Mohan’. As a writer the protagonist Jaya, got a prize for her story. But Mohan felt insulted by the story as he has to face public humiliation for revealing their personal life. Mohan behaved in such a way Jaya had to stop writing. She says, “And looking at his stricken face, I had been convinced. I had done him wrong. And I had stopped writing after that” (144). In fact Jaya never tried to make Mohan understand the difference between a fictional story and the …show more content…
Deshpande points out the women in most cases have no freedom in choosing their own partners. Her The Dark Holds No Terrors told mainly in the first person narrative. The protagonist Sarita who attempts to free herself deals with the traumatic experience. She becomes the victim of exploitation by her own husband only because he is not ready to tolerate her as a popular and doctor wife’s superiority but Saru tolerates her husband’s torture, trouble and turmoil with herself with a sense of confidence but feels bad and disgusting inside. Manu, being a lecturer at the third grade college, creates great discomfort for her. His male ego is hurt by lower employment than his

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