Susan B. Anthony

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Susan B. Anthony once said, “Men their rights, and nothing more; women their rights, and nothing less.” “Susan B. Anthony was born on February 15, 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts and was raised in a Quaker household. Later went on to work as a teacher before becoming a leading figure in the abolitionist and women's voting rights movement. She partnered with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and eventually lead the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Anthony died March 13, 1906 at the age of 86 in Rochester, Ny” ( "Susan B. Anthony Biography.") Susan B. Anthony showed being an honorable individual throughout her life because she was an open-minded to everyone, no matter the race or sex, she was fair to the people who needed fairness done, and caring for everyone even if meant giving through many obstacles
Susan B. Anthony is
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She traveled extensively, campaigning on the behalf of women. Her work helped pave the way for the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) to the Constitution, giving women the right to vote.("Susan B. Anthony.") As a matter of fact, Anthony and Stanton established the Women's New York State Temperance Society in 1852. Before long, the pair were also fighting for women's rights and they formed the New York State Woman's Rights Committee. ( "Susan B. Anthony Biography.") After the Civil War, Anthony began focus more on women's rights. She helped establish the American Equal Rights Association in 1866 with Stanton, calling for the same rights to be granted to all regardless of race or sex. ( "Susan B. Anthony Biography.")This connects to being honorable because she did not want rights because she was the only woman treated unfairly, but millions of other women that were treated the same way. She wanted rights for everyone and it shouldn’t matter the race nor the sex of a

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