British Columbia Chapter 2 Summary

Decent Essays
2. Summary of British Columbia; "British Columbia" is a small topic of chapter 2, “Nation
Building, 1867-1896" of book "History of the Canadian Peoples" written by Margaret
Conrad, Alvin Finkel and Donald Fyson. In the section "British Columbia", the authors are explaining when and how the British Columbia was officially announced as a province of
Canada. They are also addressing the problems that the native people, political parties,
The government and even the people of other provinces faced problems before the declaration of British Columbia as a province of Canada. Before declaration, the economic conditions of British Columbia fluctuated, sometimes well, sometimes bad. In the beginning the idea of having British Columbia into the "confederation" was not
…show more content…
So language can also be counted in

universal themes.

• Education – We all are given education at different times in different ways.

Education can be formal or informal. Education can be knowledge given by

teacher to students in class or can be father teaching his son the moral values of

life. Therefore, Education is a universal theme.

• Currency – In past or present, we have different types of currency. In past,

currency was coins made of mud or clay. Nowadays, we have coins and notes.

But in different countries currency is known by different names. For example,

in India it is rupee, in Canada it is dollar, England had pond sterling.

• Relationships – Humans have different relations with different people. We

have mother, father, brother, husband, kids, grandparents and many other

relations.

Part C. The Political and Industrial Geography of Canada

1.) What are the 10 provinces of Canada and when did they each of them join

“Confederation”?

The 10 provinces of Canada and when each of them joined “Confederation” are as follows;

“British Columbia (June 1871), Prince Edward Island (1873)”. “Alberta (1

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