A Rhetorical Analysis Of Film

Improved Essays
Separation of Emotional and Critical Views in Film
The human race has created a complex web of social and personal relationships and connects between people, the universe, and themselves. War and Upheaval through Film has helped me understand these connections and the issues that people face through a rhetorical and contextual perspectives. The course has help me to look at films from a different perspective; it forced me to separate my emotions from the truth of what the plot is revealing to me as a spectator. There were times in which it was difficult for me to watch certain films without bias and my own opinions, and it was a constant battle between me and the truth. Besides this fact, I know that there are always going to be issues that
…show more content…
In this course, I have discovered that rhetorical choices are part of the foundation of a good storyline. There were different sources I could use to find out different points of view on what the films rhetorical choices were. For example, in Beauty and the Beast (Trousdale, Wise 1991), I used to view the film as just another Disney princess movie with no meaning behind it besides a love story. After our first viewing of Beauty and the Beast and reading its article, An Epideictic Dimension of Symbolic Violence in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast: Inter-Generational Lessons in Romanticizing and Tolerating Intimate Partner Violence I was better able to understand the perspective that Olson got on domestic violence. With the Beast’s constant rage and undermining abuse towards Belle in the beginning, the connection between what I thought was a beautiful love story and the perspective of domestic violence seemed to intertwine and my views about the film changed because of it. Filmmakers use rhetoric to create a more complex and broad story so that critics can find outliers of the film and make assumptions of the filmmaker’s rhetorical choices. Olson says [about Beauty and the Beast (1991)] that “the film’s combination of sophisticated rhetorical strategies might cultivate a romanticized understanding of and …show more content…
War and Upheaval through Film has given me not only the ability to be a critical spectator in films, but also in life. In the article, Social Issues in Disguise by Barry Brummett, he addresses that “It is hard to speak, to see a television show, or to watch a film without the stuff of our discourse implicating and alluding to some wide social issue, a social issue that us thus at least partially in disguise (Brummett 1).” I now know that in ever film I have the ability to find the rhetorical choices, why the filmmakers chose them, and I can make assumptions not based on my emotions, but on the criteria I am shown. From this course I have learned what my role as a spectators is, and that I can split my emotional thoughts from my critical thoughts to understand the full context of the films I view. This course has helped me understand what rhetoric is and how I can discover it beneath the surfaces of films. Spectators are never supposed to be truly shown the rhetorical choices of a film; we are supposed to find it for

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The very things that challenge how we will react in certain situations. “Remember The Titans” brings about these challenges and shows how the director has used textual structures to highlight the dilemmas that the characters face. It’s proven throughout the speech that there were some characters that changed their moral values in the film and began to see the world differently. By representing these dilemmas in such a way that makes the viewer really think about the world around them and not everything is fine, he has shown us that there are indeed imperfections to the ‘perfect’ world we think we live in. Boaz Yakin has created an effective film with flawless structural language and emphasised a story not of two teams playing football to win but of two teams coming together and winning over each…

    • 881 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The experiences you have while watching a film are very interesting. Typically within a film, you, the viewer, is presented with a problem or situation and it is up to you to come up with the solution. These situations may have good results or bad, but it is always up to the viewer to discover the solution. Discovering a solution is not always easy. Historian David Bordwell believes that the narration in a film cues and constrains its viewer .Directors always find ways to confuse a viewer by adding suspense into a story.…

    • 1367 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Shoah Film Analysis

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Holocaust film Schindler's List (1993) depicts many typical stereotypes associated with American films such as eroticization of the female body, good vs. evil, and the patriarchal hero. These themes cloud the real events with themes that the audience can readily associate with whereas the actual events that took place might have been entirely different. Adorno might have also thought that there are many different representations of the Holocaust, so this will give rise to counter narratives leading to Holocaust denial, rejection of many execution techniques and leads to dilution of actual events. With many repetitive Holocaust narrative patterns, they have become formulaic, as shown in Shoah. Each person in the film discloses similar events, feelings and emotions, which leads to a repetitive quality towards viewers and dampens the events that took place.…

    • 1649 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Stereotypes In Film

    • 833 Words
    • 4 Pages

    On the other hand, the second film spoke of what a man should act like, how gender norms forced a man to become violent to prove their masculinity. The two films have different focus points however, both reveal topics that are relevant in society. The first story film was directed by Rose McGowan. The film is appealing because of its exquisite details and designed meaning…

    • 833 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Pocahontas made several normative claims that further advanced ideologies such as interracial relationships, the misinterpretation of Native Americans, and gender roles. Implicit ideology can be seen within the film text only through a deeper level of interpretation. Jonathan Rosenbaum, a well-known film critic, suggests that what is created to make people feel good at the movies is actually a reflection of their opinion of the world around them. When we, as viewers, form opinions of the world around us after watching something on screen, we usually come to those conclusions through the subtle messages that are thrown at us. Pocahontas is an interesting movie because it has many ideologies that are further advanced through a representation of actual history.…

    • 2227 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Baraka Film Analysis

    • 1148 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Baraka's footage indicates how peoples and societies around the globe aren't the same as ours. The pictures of the poor additionally add a picture of magnificence to the film that is in building up its subject. All through the film, shots are arbitrarily transitioned to diverse things. It goes with the excellence of the film. We watched Baraka see an illustration of expert film shots and altering.…

    • 1148 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    While Pulp Fiction and other popular films can reflect the beliefs and values of a society, they can also have a tremendous amount of influence on the people in them. Popular media can heavily impact the view of what is acceptable and what is not in a society. When films glorify immoral or prejudiced ideas, they only popularize them more and promote negative or harmful behavior. Filmmakers should be cautious of how they portray the more controversial aspects of a culture; in the case of Pulp Fiction, Tarantino ends up promoting violence and racism as legitimate sources of…

    • 1235 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Just watching a movie we really miss a lot of the incentives it offers and how to open our minds to a broader field of understanding, dissecting and finding the meaning in its purpose. This is yet another approach that I can use as I continue my studies. There are certainly a lot of reflection in the study of film. Intellectually, these studies offer me with an alternative way of looking at film and thinking. Instead of looking for a single subject as I watch a film, I can know look and think of the varied subjects on their implications on life, self and…

    • 1724 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The understanding of the world can be also affected by the movies. A more extreme case is that the value system and worldview of Star Wars are applied in the real world. While the atmosphere and the products of the movies surround us, even for the people who have never watched the films, they are also affected. People could substitute themselves into the “world” of Star Wars. Moreover, the political system in the movies is similar to the real world.…

    • 969 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As you watch the film, you notice shadows, chaos, and depth. Cameraman Toland brought deep scope, which adds extra dimensions to the scene, possibly to show Kane’s self-worth and isolation over the people in his life. When watching the film, notice how scenes are broken up and spaced out through things like a desk, a column, and even just a piece of paper. Look to the background for more understanding of how Kane feels about the world around him. Watch as the shadows cast over the characters and the chaos of their lives play out on screen.…

    • 809 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays