The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict

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“The Jews who will it shall achieve their State. We shall live at last as free men on our own soil” (Herzl, 1896). The Palestinian-Israeli conflict arose because of confrontations over land. Both the Muslim Palestinian Arabs and the Jews wanted the same land and they each had their own valid reasons for why it was justified their permanent occupation of Palestine was justified. In the late 1890s, Jewish Europeans started to migrate to Palestine because they believed that Palestine was their religious homeland; these new migrations angered the Arabs, who were already occupying Palestine, because they did not want to give up their land to the Zionists. The increasing tensions - caused by the Jewish migrations to Palestine continue to affect Palestine …show more content…
Starting around the 1940s, when new anti-combat laws were established in Palestine for Jews to be able to live in peace and to prosper in their newly acquired “homeland” without Palestinian interference, the Palestinian Arabs’ power decreased as Israel’s land increased. Due to the ongoing violence in Palestine, the Extraordinary Zionist Conference called for the Biltmore conference, a peace conference representing the needs of the Zionists. The Biltmore conference (1942) stated, “Palestine should be opened for unlimited immigration under Jewish monitor, and that it also be established as a Jewish commonwealth” (Harms, 1408). In favor of the Jewish immigrants, this conference caused the Zionists to make more migrations to Palestine, caused the formation of new alliances against other nations and decreased the Palestinian Arabs’ power through their …show more content…
Before the Palestinian-Israeli conflict even started, “the aim of Zionism [was] to create for Jewish people a home in Palestine Secured by public law...[It was] the strengthening and fostering of Jewish national sentiment and consciousness…”(Harms, 992). This idea angered the Palestinians originally living in Palestine who didn’t want new people invading their land, which then caused the Palestinian Arabs to unify against the Zionists through pan-Arabism, which increased Arabian nationalism through their pride in their religion and native country. This increase in nationalism caused their nation to work for the good of their religious state, which maintained their unification. Although the Biltmore conference decreased the Palestinian Arabs’ power through their decrease in nationalism by their loss of land, it also caused the Palestinians to unite religiously against Zionism through bringing the international community into the conflict and increasing the spread of Islam. The Palestinian Arabs, as a whole, wanted their original land they occupied back; in order to maintain a strong Arabian modern nation state, they would have to unify Arabs around the Middle East with pan-Arab ideas against the

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