African Americans In The 20th Century Essay

Improved Essays
During the 20th century and throughout the course of history up until the present day, there have been immense racial injustices inflicted upon African-Americans. After the conclusion of the Civil War, in 1865, African-Americans received their “freedom” however this freedom was short-lived due to the amount of racial tensions that existed in America during the late 19th century and throughout the 20th century. The treatment of this group of people was horrendous and despicable. However, African-Americans sought to make their everyday lives easier by fighting for what they believed in, which was racial equality for all colors of people. Their courageous efforts to demoralize racial inequality were noteworthy. They endured constant abuse and ignorance from other citizens in the United States, but they made the best out of their situation. …show more content…
Ferguson (1896) case. This Supreme-Court decision declared segregation constitutional and said that there could be separate but equal facilities for whites and African-Americans. The legitimization of segregation opened the doors for the Jim Crow Laws in the South. African-Americans were subject to racial injustices in restaurants, public transportation, lodging, and in many more locations. To keep the African-Americans in control, there was an increase in the amount of mob violence against African-Americans. Many were publically lynched so that other African-Americans would be intimated and scared to defy the segregation laws put in place by the Jim Crow laws (Bailey 507). However, the advent of World War I in Europe played a major role in bettering the lives of African-Americans. European immigration to the United States came to a standstill after World War I erupted in Europe. The government issues the Immigration Act of 1917, which greatly reduced the amount of Europeans allowed in the US (USCIS OL). There were requirements that made it necessary for

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    The United States in the early 1900’s was characterized by racism towards African Americans and their plea for equality. Despite the Civil War and 13th Amendment ridding the U.S. of slavery, society still favored whites and many African Americans were discriminated against because racism was still a monumental issue. Many court cases were created regarding African American equality, and not many ended by them gaining it. The Jim Crow Laws impacted the government by providing it the power to enforce segregation and disallowed African Americans to have facilities equivalent to those of whites. Not only did the laws impact the lifestyle of African Americans, but it also assisted contributed to the spread of racism and violence towards African Americans.…

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Jim Crow Laws Effects

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The laws didn’t allow the blacks to have total freedom, although they technically were free from slavery. The government made the decision to ignore their freedom and placed the laws only on the non-whites. The whites hatred for blacks caused violence that arose during those times. These laws which made the blacks inferior to the whites, this compelled them to eventually start to protest and riot. At around 1882, many black people started to get lynched, as the number began to increase throughout the years, the more violent the citizens got.…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Abraham Lincoln once explained that “the assertion that all men are created equal was of no practical use in effecting our separation from Great Britain and it was placed in the Declaration not for that, but for future use”. However, even though the notion of equality laid the groundwork of our nation’s principles, African Americans have struggled against inequality for several centuries in the United States. Although the Emancipation Proclamation declared their freedom from slavery in 1863, blacks continued to face different forms of racial discrimination in the following years. In the South, harsh oppressive laws prohibited these individuals from attaining equal opportunities. In hope for equality, a large number of African Americans chose…

    • 2114 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    The civil war also combined new freedoms by bringing breakdown, trauma, and tragedies. The war overstated the failure of the American system and it compromised that the system had never weakened the institution of slavery. Moreover, the long-term outcome of this revolutionary decision was between political revenge, competing pressures for reconciliation, reunion, and forgiveness (Davis, Inhuman Bondage, 299). Furthermore, the desire for reconciliation and healing that was strengthened by white racism and disappointment over modernizations led to a division that divided whites from blacks and deprived emancipation (Davis, Inhuman bondage, 305). The division between races was due to the political movements that were occurring at the time.…

    • 1882 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Malcolm X Essay

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The Black Lives Matter movement protested on violence and racism, but people refer to the fact that All Lives should matter. Furthermore; blacks suffered through centuries of slavery, civil rights, mass incarcerations and brutality. BLM specified values and importance of black lives but did not regard the case that All Lives…

    • 1204 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Abraham Lincoln’s “Emancipation Proclamation” ensured freedom and a hope for a better life to the African American community. Three decades later, the idea of a better life had been forgotten. Instead, the Black Americans had begun to endure their suffering, pretending that the unfair laws created by the White Americans were fair. Paul Dunbar describes in his poem, “We Wear the Mask,” the roles that African Americans began to play in life in order to survive. In his poem, you are able to understand the pain, fear, and hope that comes with the “mask” they wear.…

    • 707 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The First World War, 1914 through 1918, occurred during the middle of the Jim Crow period where African-Americans were relegated to second class citizens and racial discrimination. Jim Crow separated the black population from the white population and elevated white supremacy as the rule of law. The war brought hopeful opportunity for the blacks in the hopes of achieving a measure of equality with whites and a sense of citizenship in America. The black population embraced the opportunity to do their part and show not just their loyalty but sense of worth to themselves and the white population. The paper will analyze how African Americans were affected by the war as observers and participants of the First World War.…

    • 1094 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The conclusion of the 1861 Civil War was the first step towards black rights, which changed the titles of blacks from “property” to “citizen”. Although blacks were granted freedom from the oppression of slavery, they were still oppressed legislatively by the Jim Crow laws. These laws displayed major segregation between the whites and blacks through racial separations “from classrooms and bathrooms, from theaters and train cars, from juries and legislatures” (Foner & Garraty). This proved that the end of slavery was not the end of oppression, which frustrated many blacks. They were forced to obey the unjust word of government like they had to before their emancipation.…

    • 1724 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Since the early 1600’s when the first of the African Americans came to America they have been discriminated and treated as the lesser race. The time between 1887 through present day have seen some of the worst conditions for the African Americans. With such things as Jim Crow laws which were laws put in place for racial segregation, these laws saw the uprising of civil rights which lead to the expansion and worldwide recognition of racial segregation. African Americans responded to this by strikes and civil rights movements, but with people such as Booker T. Washington the presence of fighting back became weaker as Washington wanted to accept racial discrimination, we also see people like Malcom X who have a much more radical view on the civil…

    • 1652 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    These historical developments became problematic because “if we want to talk about freedom, we must mean freedom for others as well as ourselves, and we must mean freedom for everyone inside our frontiers as well as outside,” (191). Additionally, Jim Crow Laws were issued which legalized the segregation of African Americans. The conditions in which African Americans lived their daily lives were far more inferior to the conditions of Whites. The education, social and economic situation for African Americans were tormented during Jim Crow Laws. These developments made relations in desperate need of improvement because many Americans began noticing that the acceptance of other ethnicities and races was extremely important in order for the US to form alliances with other nations.…

    • 1264 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays