Paul's Letter Rhetorical Analysis

Improved Essays
Martin Luther
Summary
Since Paul is personally not familiar with the Roman Catholic Church, he begins with writing a letter by introducing himself. He is called the “apostle” and he has a mission to “bring about the obedience of faith among the Gentiles” (1:1-5). Paul follows up his introduction with a greeting to the church and shares his desires to teach in Rome someday. He then gives a short summary of what the theme of his letter was “The Gospel…. The power of God for redemption to everyone who has faith, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed through faith for faith” (1:16-17). Paul than starts talking about the state of humanity before redemption through of the faith of God. He explains how the Gentiles looked up to idols, having devotion for God, and how Jews failed to follow the law correctly, acting in a way that is not appropriate to the Jewish ideals, which means they are committing a sin. Paul continues saying that God’s promise to the Jews is symbolized by circumcision, doesn’t bring immediate redemption, “A person is a
…show more content…
He brings this up to certain communities, most of them were established by Paul. Travel was slow and far distances that communication was extremely difficult, having Paul’s letters was a means of having his spirit in the community once he left, or having to direct a community from a distance. The main purpose of the letters was to give a sense of a togetherness for believers of faith during hard times. These letters were also very personal, where responding to problems of the community were addressed accordingly. By far, with the exception of letter to the Romans, his letters have little to no proof that they were supposed to have permanent documents. Paul, just like other Christians, wanted a Second Coming, and wrote his letters to express problems rather than creating a lasting issue to the

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    The Roman church had not yet been visited and had no New Testament because the gospels were not yet being circulated in their final written form. Thus, this letter may well have been the first piece of Christian literature the Roman believers had seen. In Roman culture to choose to be a servant was unthinkable. Paul was a Roman citizen but chose to be entirely dependent on and abide in Christ Jesus (Romans 1:1). Paul’s impact was made known because of his citizenship and willingness to serve and obey Jesus…

    • 1432 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Nonetheless, Paul does not write his letters to the Ephesians to rebuke them of their transgressions, his letters have another purpose. He writes his letters about God’s eternal purpose of the church. “It would serve as an antidote to the pagan mystery religions which were all around them, and to the arguments of the Judaizers who would be using all their powers of persuasion to impress these former pagans” (Turner, 1998). The letters were about praising God and growing spiritually in Christian maturity so we can be with Him forever. They emphasized about the plan of redemption for His people and promising the grace of God will be upon them.…

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Paul, through his own bias, assumes that the state of humanity is at a very vulnerable and dangerous point. He believes that the followers of the Jewish faith have been behaving wrongly and not…

    • 734 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Hindson & Townes (2015) explain how Paul lays out the theme of his letter in two ways. “(1) The gospel is the power of God that leads to salvation, and (2) the righteousness of God by faith is revealed in the gospel” (Ch. 32). By studying the book of Romans one can grow in their knowledge and faith.…

    • 1280 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In a number of his letters, Paul emphasized the importance of Jesus’ death and resurrection. He also stresses the importance of understanding the end of time, the importance of preparing for it, and the importance of how one should go about preparing for the end. His ethics are built around the idea of how one lives in anticipation of the end, something Paul experienced firsthand while writing his letters. He expressed this in Philippians…

    • 1072 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Liberty University Online October 11, 2015 BIBL 425 B07 BIBLICAL CHRISTIAN WORLDVIEW 1. Paul spent much of his missionary time teaching Jesus’s word. Paul often refers to himself as a salve of God, and with this he brings the true meaning of Jesus’s message to us on many instructional levels.…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Paul’s third missionary journey (Acts 18-21) from A.D 53-57 he travelled to Ephesus in this time wrote 1 Corinthians then finally to Macedonia and Jerusalem, where he wrote 2 Corinthians and Romans from Corinth while he was waiting for his departure. (McRay, 2003). The purpose of these missionary journeys was to educate those who found Christ through St. Pauls preaching. His three principles on his missionary journeys were: Jesus was the Son of God and the Messiah is foretold by the prophets of Israel; Jesus’s death compensated for all men’s sin’s and opened heaven to humanity; the Mosaic Law had, by the fact of Jesus’ salvation, been repealed and replaced by the Law of Jesus. This brought the Jews and Gentiles close together there was no longer any division between them.…

    • 2124 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots” (Garvey). If we truly grasp this quote from Marcus Garvey and portray it to class, we can understand just how important the course Western Civilization I really is. What I mean is that the pivotal points of history that is taught in Western Civilization I helps to guide the people of today to a brighter future. Using these key historical events that is gone over in the course, we can use this information to mold the future from the mistakes of the past and create a successful and efficient future. In the conclusion of this paper, the reader will see how important the following three key events are, for today’s world, and the imminent future.…

    • 1423 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Two Letters To Titus

    • 268 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Timothy and Titus were young leaders and traveled from church to church preaching God’s word. Timothy ministry taught against false teaching and organizing local churches to live a divine life. Paul wants to emphasize how God’s truth would produce love, which comes “from a pure heart, from a good conscience, and from sincere faith” (Bible). In Titus, Paul emphasis temperance, self-control, integrity, and uprightness. He warned the believers to live right, so it would give believers a bad name.…

    • 268 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Romans Scriptual Analysis

    • 1111 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Paul explores this because the Jews cared about the law that they failed to recognize anybody outside their particular culture. Also, Paul goes ahead to recognize the significance of the law, in spite of its irrelevance in defense. Jews had an awful association with the Gentile culture because the Jews tended to view them as so corrupt that they needed not be redeemed. Paul confronted the culture in his letters. From the congregation's notoriety in Rome, he realized that God was working there and frantically needed to be a part of it.…

    • 1111 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Yes, I also agree Paul's tone is strong and angry. His upsetting with the Galatian believers reflects that he really cares about their faith and also the most important thing is that he cares about the pure faith in Christ not any other things. If he did not care about these people, he would not bother to write them the letter. And as our text book and prof. Jennings said, the whole point of Paul's argument is based on his sole focus on Christ alone, not something else.…

    • 266 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Paul was inspired by God to write so many books in the New Testament in the book of Romans. There are a lot of lessons from this epistle Paul wrote to the Romans. To begin with, there are two main lessons to be learned from chapter 1. First is a prayer for others.…

    • 460 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Essay On Paul

    • 858 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In his letters, Paul demands loyalty from his followers, and asks them to defend the…

    • 858 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the text, Paul developed his argument by building up his credibility as an apostle for Christianity. Paul was previously known to fight against Christianity and refuse what it held true. However, he wanted to convince the Gentiles, those who did not follow the Christian faith, that he was previously blinded from the truth. He claimed to have had undertaken a revelation from God and discovered God as the truth he was missing. “If I build up again the very things that I once tore down, then I demonstrate that I am a transgressor” (Letters of Galatians: 2:18).…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He also warned that God was no longer going to tolerate the ignorance and they must repent because God has a day of judgment for them. This was powerful words that grabbed the attention of the people that were before Paul. I believe he felt it was time to let them know exactly what God wanted from the people and that they must repent before the wrath of God be released. Paul used many concepts that I found located in my textbook to adapt his message at Athens.…

    • 589 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays