Monstrosity In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Although many people consider ugly creature’s monsters, Mary Shelley shows throughout Frankenstein that true monstrosity is shown through one’s actions and intentions, not their looks. In the novel, Victor Frankenstein is portrayed as a mad man who is striving to discover the secret of life. He creates an unnamed creature who begins to wreak havoc across Europe. In the end of the story, Victor chases after the creature to the North Pole where the two each suffer a gruesome fate. At first glance, this creature would seem like the monster of the story as it is by his hands that many lost their lives, but Shelley argues that in fact it is Victor who is the monster. Shelley’s views on “monstrosity” can be seen in the novel by her portrayal …show more content…
Throughout the story, the connection between Frankenstein and his monster can be viewed as one between a father and his son. Sadly, in this father-son relationship the son wants a relationship with his father but the feelings are not reciprocated. Frankenstein becomes another irresponsible parent who does not see to it that the child is raised in a good environment. In fact, Frankenstein abandoned his creation completely when he ran away screaming in attempt to never have to see him again. This scene allows for the reader to witness Frankenstein prejudge his own creation, his own child, as a monster when in all actuality it is the doctor himself who is the true monster. It is not until the two are united again that Frankenstein even begins to understand the bond he shares with his creation. The creature informs him “All men hate the wretched; how then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us” (Shelley Chapter 10). This quote allows for the reader to witness the creature’s incredible mind as well as his broken and tattered relationship with the only human he truly knows. Even after all of this, Frankenstein still does not understand that this creature is his child and it is his …show more content…
At the beginning of the work, Victor believed he was smarter than anyone on Earth and that he alone had the power to create new life. He forms a god-like image of himself which continues to distance himself from the world around him, much like the Titan Prometheus. On top of arrogance, Victor did not take responsibilities for his own actions when it came to his own creation. This led to death and destruction that could have easily been avoided if the doctor had only given his creation a chance before running away calling him a hideous beast. Instead, Frankenstein showed a disregard for human life as he did not act on the monsters actions when his brother died or Justine was executed for the crime he really caused. It is not until his best friend dies that Victor begins to attempt to stop his creation, but at that point it is already too late and his lovely wife Carolina suffers a painful death all because of her husband’s

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