Analysis Of The Handmaid's Tale

Superior Essays
The Handmaid's Tale
It is a book by Margaret Atwood, a Canadian citizen. This was written by and issued in 1995. This story is set in New England in a totalitarian and Christian theonomy that overthrew the government of United States (Atwood, pg. 6). The novel entails the journey of the handmaid Offred, emphasizing on the possessive nature of Fred as handmaids are forbidden in using their names and echo the male or master that they serve.
The tale explores the women themes of women in subjugation to misogyny in a patriarchal society and the different ways in which these women get individualism and independence (Taylor, pg. 5). The novel's title reflects the necessary parts of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, a series of the stories
…show more content…
The novel can be said as a dual narrative, Offred's fiction, and the Handmaid's tales. The night part is about Offred, and the rest such as household, waiting room, shopping, etc. are the narratives describing the possible life of each Handmaid, although from Offred's perspectives (Atwood, pg. 10). In these sections, Offred sails between the past and present as she says of the occasions that lead up to the collapse of the rights of the women and the current information in the life she lives.
The tale has essential quotes and they are explained each.
Ordinary, said Aunt Lydia is what you are used to. This may not seem ordinary to you now, but after a time it will. It will become regular.
Ofglen stood by the wall, looking at the people's bodies that were hanged by Gilead. This horrified her, but she had to strain pushing aside her fears. She pressed back her disgust, and remembered aunt Lydia's words on how ordinary the life of Gilead has resulted. The statement from Aunt Lydia reflected the totalitarian state authority like Gilead transforming natural mankind responses like the blankness' execution transforming horror into normalcy (Atwood, pg. 11). The words from aunt Lydia proposed that Gilead succeeded not only by earning trust from individual with the right ways but made them forget another world that how they
…show more content…
The story suggested that Offred recounted not the occasions from a far, considering the past in her life. Instead, she describes Gilead's horror as a daily experience. The act of narrating Offred's fiction made her rebel her community (Taylor, pg. 14). Gilead wanted ladies silenced whereas Offred spoke out although he was an existing leader. Gilead denied women's control on their future, but Offred ‘s created of a narrative and gave what she called the ending control.
I used to think of my body as an instrument, of pleasure, or a means of transportation, or an implement for the accomplishment of my will. Now the flesh arranges itself differently. I'm a cloud, congealed around a central object, the shape of a pear, which is hard and more real than I am and glows red within its translucent wrapping.
The Quote is said as Offred sat in the bathroom, no clothes, and contrasted t she the manner thought about herself to the way she currently felt about herself (Taylor, pg. 13). Previously, her body was a tool, a self-extension, now herself-doesn't matter anymore and her central object, the womb, is what makes her vital because it can bear her

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    There were laws placed that were originally made to worship a woman’s body but women felt their bodies were something to fear and hide. Women like Offred feel more enslaved to the idea of being “protected” rather than being protected. She stated, “Now the flesh arranges itself differently. I’m a cloud, congealed around a central object, the shape of a pear, which is hard and more real than I am and glows red within its translucent wrapping” (Atwood 73). Offred talks about how the body that once was hers is no longer hers and no longer matters.…

    • 994 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This relates to those who use “women” and “insanity” together because the women are described as rebels whom madness is nothing more than a description that applies to the gender norms in society. Society doesn’t view insanity as a desperate communication for the powerless but views it more as a form of rebellion against confinement. The fact that the narrator peeled the wallpaper away in search of the woman trapped inside is deeply symbolic and gives the reader a sense of how she feels about society confining her. The narrator says, “I’ve got out at last, in spite of you and Jane! And I’ve pulled off most of the paper, so you can’t put me back” (pg.…

    • 1165 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Margaret Laurence’s novel, The Fire-Dwellers, evidently illustrates Susan Maushart’s theory, the Mask of Motherhood, through the protagonist, Stacey MacAindra struggles to cope and maintain a balance between her internal and external self, the pressure to be a “good” mother, and her consistent self-blame. In her theory, Maushart discusses how the mask of motherhood oppresses women and their ability to freely talk about how they really feel. Furthermore, she talks about the side-effects that may occur due to this oppression and ridiculous double-standards that society puts on mothers (Maushart, 2007). Though the novel is in third-person, Laurence uses a simple dash to illustrate Stacey’s inner-thoughts and true feelings towards each situation. By doing so, it…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One’s imagination is one’s reality, the mindset and possibility an event or action can be. In the novel The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, the novel presents a dystopian literature that emits an alternate reality of life. The story is gives off the government being broken and the society itself completely changed to the ways a few wanted which stripped women’s rights, United States of America changed to Republic of Gilead, and the Gilead made some women into Handmaids which used just for breeding. Though not all women are handmaids mostly because they can’t have a child. The Handmaid’s Tale provides a possibility that it actually can happen in real life with the flashbacks from Offend used to remember Pre-Gilend, how the events that…

    • 733 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Therefore, the dresses portray their primary functions as that of giving birth. The handmaids who cannot bear children are branded the “Unwoman” nickname and get continuously dissaproved for their condition. According to Atwood, the color red also implies the blood of the menstrual cycle and childbirth. The use of winged eyes that represent the eyes of God refer to the Gilead’s secret police which shows the watchfulness of the theocratic state. Therefore, the Gilead society has adopted the ideology that the eyes of the state and God are the same.…

    • 2187 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the novel A Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood portrays the life of women in the future dystopian society as unpleasant, brutal, and horrific. The women in the novel have no power and are only useful for having babies. Atwood shows her feelings on this matter through the main character, Offred, and the people she surrounds herself with. Handmaid’s, Martha’s, Unwomen, and the Wives are the groups that make up the social hierarchy. Atwood causes us to open our eyes and ask ourselves: are women in today’s society Handmaids, Martha’s, Unwomen, or the Wives.…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Feminist Analysis Women around the world have been suppressed continuously for their persona, intellect, color, and their gender. In several stories such as The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Story of an Hour, and The Awakening both by Kate Chopin all give the reader an illustration of how men practice patriarchal oppression towards women. The feminist movement in the mid 1800’s, where women strongly opposed a man’s mistreatment, created a movement to confirm a woman’s worth. According to Feminist Analysis Theory, by Donald Hall, feminist’s main focus is to, “explore on the complex ways in which women have been denied social power and the right to various forms of self-expression” (Hall 199). Feminist study the ways in…

    • 1297 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As the story progresses the readers only get to see and experience the very outer shell of Emily’s personality. The readers get a glimpse as to why Emily acts the way she does, much contributed to the controlling ways of her deceased father. Readers experience an eerie sensation as they unfold her bizarre ways that include a case of mental instability and an obsession with dead bodies. Faulkner’s short story ultimately showcases an estranged girl that aches for love and acceptance, something that has been kept from her throughout her entire…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One of the things that Charlotte Bronte does brilliantly is how she encompasses these secrets into her novel, revealing pieces of information right from the start about the mysteries of Jane 's family that draws the reader in. One of the first things she reveals about Jane is how lonely she is, despite living with the only relatives she thinks she has left, Jane describes herself as "a discord of Gateshead, I was like nobody there; I had nothing in harmony with Mrs.Reed or her children, or her chosen vassalage. "(Bronte 10). The poor relationship Jane has with her family members at Gateshead influences Mrs.Reed 's later decision to withhold the letter that Jane 's uncle sent to Mrs.Reed to inquire about the whereabouts of Jane. Her mysterious inheritance was later made more clear when she finally receives the letter that Mrs.Reed had withheld from her all those years ago due to Mrs. Reeds hatred towards Jane.…

    • 1519 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Madame is a woman who comes and visits Hailsham and shows little interest in the students, this conveys that the world outside of Hailsham condemns Kathy’s kind and that she will constantly be fighting a predetermined identity that civilisation has formed for her. In contrast, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, portrays the progression of finding identity in extreme circumstances. The name of the characters reveals early on in the novel that people within Gilead society don’t have a sense of individualism, for example ‘Ofglen’ or ‘Offred’’, carries on the theme of loss of identity, since the ‘Of’ portrays how they are a possession of another person. It seems to be that powerless women fit much better into this patriarchal society. Confined at the Red Centre in Gilead, Offred, the narrator and all females are prohibited from speaking to the other women or using personal names.…

    • 1936 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Great Essays