On Being Sane In Insane Places

Good Essays
Since the 1960s, state funded mental institutions have always been less of a concern to the people. After a few studies and the discover of human rights abuse and mass cruelty, state funded mental institutions have changed their methods drastically throughout the years.
The various types of abuse that the patients had to endure through were horrifying. Misdiagnosis such as deafness was considered retardation, and the psychiatric would sentence them into the institutions without considering a second option or opinion. The facilities would often intentionally over prescribe pills, and practically overdose their patients. The patients had no rights to refuse what was giving to them. If the patients decided to argue with the workers, they would
…show more content…
The Rosenhan study “On being sane in insane places” is what finally opened the eyes of the public to the harsh realities of the insinuations. In the study, eight “pesudopatients” (colleagues of Roshenhan), which consisted of three psychologists, a pediatrician, a psychiatrist, a painter and a housewife, admitted themselves into a mental institution saying that they were hearing voices such as “empty”, “hallow” and “thud”. Roshenhan studied cases that found no “sane” patients saying that they heard those voices. The facility then did not know what they had and diagnosed them as schizophrenia, except one which was diagnosed with manic-depressive disorder, which now-a-days is known as bipolar disorder. The pesudopatients were tasked on keeping journals of everyday cruelties and treatments. Overall their human rights were completely taken away. Nurses would change in front of the patients as if they were not there, workers would beat patients if they urinated themselves, and did not even make certain that the patients were taking their medication. Several months have passed by and the workers were never able to distinguish the pesudopatients from the “insane” ones. It was only until Roshenhan announced the study that the pesudopatients were released from the insinuations. From these results, Roshenhan believed that doctors can not actually diagnose mental …show more content…
According to Erving Goffman, “We play different parts determined by the situations we take ourselves to be in”. Goffman conducted a study called “Asylums” in 1956, which he poses as a pseudo-employee of St. Elizabeths Hospital for a year, an assistant of the athletic director, and collected data on selected aspects of patients’ social life. He, like in Roshenhan studies, found harsh treatments of the patients. He also found that the patients shared similar social characteristics to that of normal people. They had group mentality and shared information with one another. For example, they told each other to pee in the radiator to avoid beatings from the worker if they soiled

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Rosenhan Study Summary

    • 799 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It made people think if the industry was flawed and innocent people were unnecessarily being labeled and being forced to live with such extreme stigmatizations. Thomas Szasz says that mental disorder diagnoses have been over diagnosed and overblown. Many people who do not have any mental disorder are being forced to take medications and become burdened with the stigmatization of the disorder, he argues. He was anti-psychiatry as he rejected nearly all the ideas that were taught in the field of psychiatry. The study by Rosenhan was a significant study in the 1970s, as it showed how little evidence there was to be needed in order to be considered…

    • 799 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    One participant was a psychology graduate student in his 20’s and the remaining were older and established, meaning they were more settled in life. Three participants were women, five were men and all participants had a range of careers. The presence of the participants and the research was not known to the hospital staffs. The participants, now pseudopatients, were sent to twelve different quality psychiatric intuitions in five different states on the East and West coast. They were instructed to enter the admissions office and complain that they had been hearing voices All but one of the pseudopatients were admitted with schizophrenia.…

    • 707 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    They have been told their whole lives that drugs are bad, but without them knowing why, they could care less and go out and try drugs. Legalizing would provide more places that give others information about drugs, and people would be less scared to check these places out. The shame that people feel when using something that is illegal is also harmful. There are many addicts that don 't know how and where to get help without feeling some kind of fear. These addicts feel…

    • 1671 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It illustrates how an individual is quickly identified as a schizophrenic after stating he heard voices. This experiments shows that physician could easily misinterpret a healthy individual as sick within the psychiatric medical system. I have experienced this first hand after seeing multiple doctors for mental health. Each of them asked me similar questions, but struggled to pinpoint the exact reason for what I was feeling. This caused the physicians to contradict each other because one would diagnose me with one mental disorder, while the other would say the complete opposite.…

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For starters, the Unites States has always been at war with drugs. With having drug test effective it will decrease the amount of drugs that have been in and out of the nation. First of all, doing away with drugs will eliminate the number or drug abusers that are on welfare meaning the state will only receive less money. There is a war on drugs and drug testing can decrease the use of drugs and lead these people into the right path. Many jobs require drug tests therefore those who apply for welfare should as well (Brown).…

    • 1532 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mental Illness In Prisons

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The study demonstrated the specific issue experienced by persons with severe mental illnesses, moreover, individuals who may fall into a self-perpetuating cycle of conflict to management substance abuse, violent behavior, and re offending. History Treatments in the 1800 's were not taken very seriously. Before hospitals were available, a person with mental illness was usually isolated from their families and had to stay home at all times. Those who had a family member with a metal illness denied their existence because the mentally ill were housed with criminals and were often physically abused. Mid 1800 's Mid 1800s was when the first few hospitals were built and were intended to house thousands of people.…

    • 1577 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For example; the preceptor would state to the nursing student “Didn’t you learn anything I showed you? !” and just leave the nursing student by themselves. This would create a negative learning experience and undermine the nursing student’s abilities to take care of a client. A study was conducted in the United Kingdom. The outcome of the study was “three hundred thirteen nursing students during their second and third year of clinical placement: 53% reported experiencing some type of bullying by doctors and senior nursing staff within the clinical setting.” 3 “The most noticeable behavior of bullying was ignored or not included was 34%, about 30% suffered destructive criticism and 29% were embarrassed in front of others.” 3 In my clinical experience, I was almost subjected to bullying, but I quickly told my nursing instructor and it was taking care of.…

    • 858 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    She continuously mentally abused the patients rather than trying to get them back on track with their lives. Lobotomies and electroshock therapy were given to patients just because they were misbehaving or were not following directions from the Orderlies or Nurse Ratched. Some may say that Nurse Ratched was only doing was she thought would be best for the sake of the patients, but there was no consent from the patients or their families for these types of procedures to be performed to somehow “alter” their behaviors to make it easier to manage them. In a hospital, patients are expected to be improving and properly cared for. Instead, patients were threatened by Nurse Ratched during meetings, which she led, were physically and mentally abused, and were given unnecessary medications and procedures to calm the patients.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Rosenhan, D. L. (1973). On being sane in insane places. Science, 179, 250-258. Insane or Not David Rosenhan conducted a study investigating the ability to distinguish the difference between the sane and insane in insane environments. The study involved pseudopatients who travelled to separate psychological hospitals where all but one of them were diagnosed and admitted with schizophrenia after all complaining to hear voices.…

    • 1751 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    But the guards won’t let the prisoners tell their parents that they are being tortured and beaten. The guards had the prisoners write letters to their parents but they never shipped the letters out so none of the letters got to their parents. The guards got so mean and rude to the prisoners that they started to have mental breakdowns because they started to I believe that they were in prison. This caused The Stanford Prison Experiment to end after 6 days instead of lasting 2 weeks. This experiment affected the prisoners so much that those prisoners had to get a therapist to help them with their problem.…

    • 869 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays