Marriage In Pride And Prejudice Analysis

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Register to read the introduction… It stresses a society where marriage is a very important and …show more content…
It is was not right for the daughter to choose whomever she liked for her husband and any woman who wanted a happy marriage would not have done this. In the case of the elopement of Wickham and Lydia, this is very much looked down upon and as something rather radical and misfortunate for the family.

Austen represents the high-society of her time from an observational point of view, ironically describing human behaviour. She describes what she sees and adds her own view in a very light and easy way. She never seems to be arrogant or cold in her criticism but applies it in a playful manner. This playfulness, and her witty, ironic comments on society are probably the main reasons that make this novel still so enjoyable for readers today.

There are eight marriages in total portrayed to us by Austen, but some of them are more significant than others. Austen's techniques and how she uses them to show us the marriages influences how we see the marriages. She manages to pass her own view onto the reader but she isn't telling us what to think, it's by the way she shows the marriages that is crucial.

We see many incidents through Elizabeth's eyes; even when we
…show more content…
This marriage is frowned upon by the society of that time. Lydia is so childish that she can't see anything that's going on. She wants to marry Wickham and doesn't see that maybe he doesn't and that he was only having a bit of fun. She is blind in her love towards Wickham and has a low opinion formed of her by both the society of that time and the reader. Wickham and Lydia's marriage is one of little "understanding of one another's characters," no "good dispositions," no "similarity in feeling and taste" and as we later find out, there is no "financial security" either. The initial attraction was based on good looks and affection for one another. But after the initial attraction, Wickham becomes disinterested in Lydia and this is even more of a problem. Lydia doesn't understand the shame she has brought upon her family and boasts that all her sisters should
"look up" to her because she is a "married woman".

The marriage between Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner is clearly a positive marriage. Mr. Gardiner used to be in the trade, but is considerate towards other people and so is Mrs. Gardiner. This is one of the reasons why they are so compatible. Elizabeth has a good opinion

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