Liberalism Vs Neoliberalism

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After WW1, the winners which were the United States, United Kingdom, and France adapted the underlying principles of liberalism that has been practiced since the 17th and 18th centuries to try and avoid war. Liberal thought is grounded in a notion that human nature is good, not evil, meaning that states thrive in a world governed by morality and law. States want to cooperate to achieve mutual goals in peace. Just like realism, liberalism derives from the observations and interpretations of political situations. Liberalism argues for human rights, parliamentary democracy, and free trade, while also maintaining that all such goals begin within the state. Liberalists want to focus more on the individual’s liberty, while realists will sacrifice an individual’s liberty for the stability of the community. Most time liberalists …show more content…
A neorealist state needs to be sure it has more to gain than its rivals. Neoliberalism is a theory shaped by the ideas of commercial, republican, sociological, and institutional liberalism. They see the international system as anarchic but believe that relations can be managed. Neoliberals think actors with common interests will try to maximize absolute gains. When applying liberal ideas to the international system today, we find two responses to the problems and possibilities posed by globalization. The first response is that of the liberalism of privilege. Which says the problems of globalization need to be addressed by a combination of strong democratic states, robust regimes, and open markets. The strategy of preserving and extending liberal institutions is open to several criticisms, which will be gathered upon radical liberalism, which sees liberalism as benefiting only a few states and individuals. Radical liberals say that there is a massive democratic deficit at the global level; they are not subject to view by

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