Japanese Internment Camps In Canada

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Japanese Canadians lived in British Columbia before the start of WW II and three quarters of them were born in Canada. In 1941, Japanese Canadians were forced to register with the government, thus declaring them as enemy aliens. After the bombing of Pearl Harbour and attack of Hong Kong, the Canadian government confiscated their property, deprived them of rights and revoked their citizenship. Despite the RCMP and the Canadian Army and Navy stating there were no evidence of military threat and that Japanese Canadians did not pose a threat to national security, they were interned in camps across the country. Many viewed this as an opportunity to eliminate the Japanese as economic competition, revealing that discrimination was common in Canada. This was a significant event to Japanese Canadians as they were Canadian citizens and did no wrong. …show more content…
Two days later, the remaining Canadians of Japanese descent were given 24 hours to pack before being relocated to internment camps. The camps did not have adequate housing, schools above elementary school level, and Canadian officials did not provide food or clothing. The government did not provide financial assistance, so people must find work or live off their savings. In the United States, the federal government offered basic food, clothing and education. The difference between the treatment of the Japanese reveals the injustice of the situation and prejudice against the Japanese. After the war ended, Japanese Canadians were encouraged to leave Canada, and many did. The ones who stayed were allowed to return to Vancouver in 1949.Japanese Canadians fought for many years so this event would be recognized. In 1988, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney apologized to the Japanese Canadians and their families in addition of compensation and returning Canadian citizenships revoked during the

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