Louisiana Slavery Impact

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Slavery's impact on Louisiana The practice of slavery has defined and formed Louisianas history for more than a hundred years. Our first accounts of slavery in Louisiana comes from the time when the French settled in Louisiana. Around 1708, Native Americans were being captured by French settlers and used as enslaved workers. However these Native Americans were not ideal, as they often escaped from their masters. The failure with Native American workers lead to the first group of African slaves in 1719. Many more ships would arrive between 1719 and 1721, as the African slaves proved useful to the settlers. The slaves had knowledge of agriculture, including how to grow rice. Enslaved Africans would become the main source of labor and profit …show more content…
The Treaty of Fountainbleau was a secret transfer of Louisiana from the French to the Spanish during the French and Indian War in 1762. The Spanish were much more tolerant with slaves and therefore set out to create a new list of slave laws. These new, fair laws would include the right to cortacion (self purchase), complain about poor treatment to the government, slaves could earn money and property, and appealing to the government to have a price set for freedom. However, many slave masters were upset and did not like these new laws. Many plantations outside of the city, just chose to ignore these laws and refer to the Code Noir. In 1795, Point Coupes Parish’s rumors of slave conspiracy reached New Orleans. The Spanish governor at the time, Carondelte, led an investigation that ultimately ended with sixty convictions. Once the convicted died, Carondelte had their heads places on wooden spikes along the River Road. These bold actions were to warn and scare other slaves with the same …show more content…
The French had taken back Louisiana from Spain to use in an effort to take back an island that had been overthrown by a slave revolt. However, when this plan failed the French sold the Louisiana territory to America. The new American governor of Louisiana, Claiborne, also set out a new slave code, but based on American practices. Slaves were not allowed the right of self purchase, complaining about unfair treatment, and were tried in separate courts after committing a crime. Although, not every colored man in Louisiana was a slave, some were free people of color. In fact, large groups of free people of color joined the militia and helped fight and defend New Orleans. However, in 1804 slave importation became illegal. Even though it was illegal, in 1809 Claiborne let a group of refugees from Haiti ,who refused to leave their slaves behind, settle in Louisiana. This action doubled the population of New Orleans in just a year. In the Antebellum period, the idea of slavery came into view more than ever. Fights over slavery split parties of government. Slaves were counted as a part of the Louisianas population. The success of plantations relied on the slaves working there. Slaves were getting hired out to do jobs in New Orleans, and getting payed for it. Slavery was such a booming business at the time, that when a person was in debt, rather than selling land, they would sell their slaves.

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