Genetic Testing: What It Means Today: Article Analysis

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Lucas, Beverly D., Ellen Wright Clayton, Bruce R. Korf, and Susan Richards. "Genetic Testing: What It Means Today." Patient Care (1998): 70-79. 15 Nov. 1998. Web. 9 Nov. 2016. This article has a very strong argument on what happens psychologically after a genetic test has taken place. In Lucas D. Beverly, Ellen Wright Clayton, Bruce R. Korf, and Susan Richards article “Genetic testing: What it means today” they talk about how psychiatrist 's help patients through their process of the very eye opening test that may give a person psychological problems. Pretest counseling is used to get the patient ready for any results that may come from their genetic test. Then after the test gets its results back, a posttest counseling session takes place …show more content…
"Confidentiality and Sharing Genetic Information with Relatives." The Lancet 375 (2010): 1507-509. 1 May 2010. Web. 15 Nov. 2016.
Anneke Lucassen and Michael Parker talk about how how sharing genetic information to relative can help save lives in their article “Confidentiality and sharing genetic information with relatives.” They talk about all of the “what ifs” about if a person decides to tell relatives about a disease that they could potentially have. Examples of real live scenarios are used to help explain how sharing this information could save a person 's life. They also give an argument against telling relatives because it is our right to keep personal information to ourselves.
The thing that is not explained in this article, is a way to inform relatives without giving away personal information. It only talks about the harms of not telling relatives and how doctors are not allowed to give away personal information. This article bases its data off of the United Kingdom in 2009, so the information is not fully up to date on ways around a person 's civil rights. In the examples used, they were from real cases but just with different names to help protect a person 's civil
…show more content…
N. Norazmi. "Forensic DNA Profiling and Database." Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences 10.2 (2003): 20-26. July 2003. Web. 15 Oct. 2016. In the article “Forensic DNA Profiling and Databases” S. Panneer Chelvam and M. N. Norazmi give case examples to how DNA profiling is used in crimes and what techniques are used to identify the person. They start out talking about deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) itself and explains that every cell in an individual 's body, with the exception of red blood cells and eggs or sperm, contains the full genetic program for that individual in its DNA. Then, it goes on to talk about the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) and how it blends computer and DNA technologies into an effective tool for comparing DNA profiles. This article is part of the Forensic Science Programme in the school of health sciences which make the article credible for the crime branch of DNA profiling. The drawback to this article is that it is written in Malaysia about United States crimes which questions the research and examples they used. I really like how they started out talking about what DNA itself is so that readers that are new to the topic can get a good

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