Genetic Testing: What It Means Today

1800 Words 8 Pages
Lucas, Beverly D., Ellen Wright Clayton, Bruce R. Korf, and Susan Richards. "Genetic Testing: What It Means Today." Patient Care (1998): 70-79. 15 Nov. 1998. Web. 9 Nov. 2016. This article has a very strong argument on what happens psychologically after a genetic test has taken place. In Lucas D. Beverly, Ellen Wright Clayton, Bruce R. Korf, and Susan Richards article “Genetic testing: What it means today” they talk about how psychiatrist 's help patients through their process of the very eye opening test that may give a person psychological problems. Pretest counseling is used to get the patient ready for any results that may come from their genetic test. Then after the test gets its results back, a posttest counseling session takes place …show more content…
"Genetic Testing for Everyone." Nature. Nature Publishing Group, 29 May 2008. Web. 10 Nov. 2016. Helen Pearson writes her article “Genetic Testing for Everyone” in the Nature newspaper in 2008. Her article is about how the use of genetic testing in healthcare can be a positive effect in the workforce for businesses. She writes about how more and more business companies each year are requiring genetic tests for their employees and also for future employees. She also goes on to say that the benefits of genetic testing can help people 's future if their results show that that have a disease. She concludes that genetic testing in the work force is very beneficial to a person 's future. Pearson’s article is very credible because it is in a credible newspaper, Nature. Her article was published in 2008 by the Nature Publishing Group and very current to today 's society. The use of researched examples of people who have gone through genetic testing really helps make this article trustworthy. She also uses opinions from doctors talking about how the testing has helped make an impact on a person 's future in a positive way. This article was very credible from the real life examples and the credible doctors …show more content…
"Genetic Privacy." Annual Review of Medicine 54 (2003): 393-407. 2003. Web. 16 Sept. 2016. Pamela Sankar 's article “Genetic Privacy” talks about the patient 's fears about getting genetically tested. She states laws about getting tests done and how the results can only be seen by the patient and the doctor. Another con to genetic testing used in this article was genetic discrimination. She brings up a new topic of genetic determinism which is the belief that a person has a disease that they don 't physically have. In the end of her article, she writes a section about the limitations of genetic testing that was the most useful part for my paper. This article was in a highly credible journal, the Annual Review of Medicine and had many credible sources as well. For this article to be published into this journal, many professional writers overview and fact check this article. Instead of using her opinion on genetic privacy, she used researched facts and statistics to prove her point. The statistics used were well documented and from

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