Gender Stereotypes In Disney Movies

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Register to read the introduction… Many grew up with the Disney movies, their catchy songs and fantasises about a special prince or princess. In the article, “The portrayal of older characters in Disney animated film,”, the authors stated, “Disney films are passed along from parent to child, which introduces each new generation new values, beliefs, and attitudes…” (Robinson, Tom 206). While Disney movies brought positive messages for children to learn; it also portrayed negative effects in the society. Disney films supported different stereotypes and social stigmas that later effected children’s view on society from childhood through adulthood; particularly girls.
In today’s society there are a lot of different definitions on how people view gender types. I am going to talk about the different stereotypes that occurred in Disney movies.
BODY
I. Disney films characterized female stereotypes and male stereotypes.
II. Stereotypes are an idea or the image of a particular type of person or thing, which can affect a children’s perspective in the society.

A. Women are portrayed as rich princesses to carry the image of looking like a Barbie doll. Women are even portrayed as evil-step mothers, or even poor servants. Regardless they always need a man; either they need a prince or a father figure to save their
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According to the Kaiser Family Foundation Report (1999), children watches an average of 2 to 5 hours of television per day.
2. Disney makes most of their characters so attractive to young girls that they want to be like them in every way.
a. They feel as if they must have perfect bodies like the princesses by wearing stylish and expensive clothing.
b. If a child sees a character that they like, they might end up choosing to imitate that character’s appearance, behavior and their actions.
c. “Little Girls of Little Women? The Disney Princess Effect,” written by Stephanie Hanes, talks about how little girls are losing their sense of imagination. Instead of them running in the back yard they are now wearing dresses to try to make themselves look pretty (Haynes, Stephanie 2012). Disney films cannot only affect your childhood, but it can also affect your adulthood.

IV. The stereotypes that occurred in Disney film can also affect a person during their adulthood. The characters portrayed in Disney films create these false ideologies of what women should grow up to be.
1. In the movies, the princesses are always paired with princes that live in castles. The movies tend to exaggerate the prince and princesses’

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