Essay On The Validity Of Eyewitness Testimony

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Reliability of Eyewitness Testimony Evidence based eyewitness identification has been acknowledged for a while now. It is known for its stubborn suggestion to inaccuracy and sensitivity. Recognizing unfamiliar faces is actually what eyewitness identification is all about. A person as the eyewitness should remember factors of intrinsic, (built-in) and extrinsic (outward) memory; which is the procedure for their memory, on the contrary it can be misleading evidence. Lineups are part of an identification process and based on an eyewitness identification, which could be a problem a criminal can be either guilty or innocent which his/her freedom could be placed in jeopardy (Walker, 2013). Being a one of a kind element, eyewitness identification proof can lead to unreliability factors, which is different from any other types of proof. Yet eyewitness identification places a powerful effect on the jury and judicial system (Walker, 2013).
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And second, what would a person do if placed in a situation? Black’s Dictionary, describes a reasonable person standard as a person who demonstrated negligent behavior within a legal standard. The person will put on a show for public viewing that demonstrates his or her intelligence and knowledge. The reasonable person standard is supposed to be a helpful tool within legalities, however it has its faults. The reason personable standard can be utilized by both judge, and jury which holds a deep affect on the legal system. Juries and judges are responsible for how the reasonable person standard is applied. Someone’s actions lies heavenly on the jury’s perception still, who is to say the judge will arrive at the same decision. It is better for a jury to be reliable as oppose to a judge once, the conclusion has presented itself when using the reasonable person standard (Shehu,

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