Pearl's Redemption In The Scarlett Letter By Nathaniel Hawthorne

1244 Words 5 Pages
Extenuating circumstances are always evident when one is confronted with moral choices; however, individual ramifications are not the only scenario to consider. Hawthorne allowed for each person The Scarlet Letter to further explain their side of the sin and how they were afflicted by the outcomes of their mysterious secret in their daily lives. Hester and Dimmesdale generated an unthought out situation for their daughter, Pearl, that could have influenced her way of living for the rest of her life, but she turned the situation around and got an exceptional outcome. Hester and Dimmesdale’s sin was made evident through Pearl, but Hawthorne allowed for all three to find redemption: Hester was not ashamed; Dimmesdale confessed; and Pearl was …show more content…
When Hester Prynne woke up each morning she had to observe the individual that was a daily reminder of the scarlet letter on her chest. In the beginning, Pearl had no problem reminiscing on her mother’s poor decisions and she even made it clear to tell her, “the sunshine does not love you because it is afraid of something on your bosom” (Hawthorne 141). The scarlet letter “A” characterized Hester Prynne of who she was as a person on the inside and outside to the townspeople, however when she finally worked up the audacity to take the discriminating letter off, she physically transposed and was described as a, “tall young woman with a figure of perfect elegance on a larger scale” (Loring). Pearl constantly reminded Hester of the “gold embroidered scarlet letter” on her chest however, she encouraged Hester to overcome her daily …show more content…
Dimmesdale was exceptionally profound of what the townspeople said about him. “People said Reverend Master Dimmesdale took it very grievously to heart that such a scandal should have come upon his congregation,” but the only thing that was hurting his heart were the pains from holding his sin in from the townspeople that admired him more than anyone. (Hawthorne 38). Dimmesdale lived his life in remorse while, Hester and Pearl were willing to “go through public humiliation and an isolated life in Puritan Society” until Dimmesdale became comfortable enough to expose his sins to the world (Loring). Pearl was a constant reminder to Dimmesdale of the marvelous life he could be living with his family however, she helped him overcome his discomposure of what the townspeople would have said about his sin by helping him overcome his fear of confession. Reverend Dimmesdale knew his health was declining and his time would be up promptly, so he announced to the townspeople that he was the “one sinner of the world” (Hawthorne 196). He confessed that he should have been deemed unholy seven years ago along with Hester and Pearl for “unbending Puritan social and moral structure” (Loring). Dimmesdale let his lust for Pearl drive him to strive for a better life, rather than hiding in the dark with his secret sin that was

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