Character Analysis Of Dimmesdale In The Song 'Let Na's Down'

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In the song “Let Nas Down” by J.Cole, he raps “Granted my heart was tainted by my mind, Apologies to OG’s for sacrificing my art. But i’m here for a greater purpose, I knew right from the start”. In the context of J.Cole 's life, He had many visions of what he wanted to do with his life. None of them were things such as getting a standard job or getting a wife. His mission was to always to change, and inspire people through rap. However in order to reach a wide amount of people, he had to create a hit songs that were crap. He has a responsibility to change lives, while also wanting to be an extremely popular/ mainstream rapper. Dimmesdale in The Scarlet Letter borders the same line except he is a pastor. Dimmesdale struggles with teaching people …show more content…
As Dimmesdale is holding in his secret, his sin is killing him on the inside like feeling satan 's wrath. He goes on preaching, while feeling he is loosing his mind like a psychopath. Chillingworth, Hester’s secret husband, and Dimmesdale private doctor, is attempting to “help him” but in reality is making Dimmesdale worse in the overall aftermath. As Hawthorne states “It is unspeakable misery of life so false as his, that it steals the pith and substance out of whatever realities are around us” (133). The effects of holding onto his passion, is slowly ruining his inward compassion. He cannot make himself dispassion, for he is too much involved with God’s phantasm. Dimmesdale is so torn by knowing he is being a hypocrite, that his misery is so unspeakable and is tearing him down bit by bit. Despite the torture Dimmesdale continuously refuses to submit. Believing that bringing good to the people will cause him to acquit. However this satisfaction never comes, and he continues to be a pastor that is counterfeit, walking a hypocritical path that is split. The effects of Dimmesdale path also affects other character’s in ways that are quite unfit. As Dimmesdale is still suffering from his secret, his sermons are becoming more powerful, and frequent. He is still in the hand of Chillingworth, but is understanding way more about heaven, and earth. As Hawthorne states “His …show more content…
As Dimmesdale suffers greatly from his pain, he decides to unrestrain, and go on the scaffold at night where he wants to drain his pain, and his actions he would not have to explain. His efforts are in vain however when he encounter Pearl, and Hester on a lane home from a funeral. As Dimmesdale states “all the dread of public exposure, that had been so long the anguish of his life, had returned upon him” (139). Dimmesdale creates a major theme of hypocrisy within the novel as a whole. He’s is trying to save his own soul, but that the same time won’t even stand with Hester, and Pearl in public with whom he condoles. If Hawthorne did not include Dimmesdale 's fears, the novel would lose his major issue between him, and Hester/Pearl which the fear smears. Hawthorne uses Dimmesdale 's path to discuss themes such as hypocrisy, and sinful living philosophies. As Dimmesdale enters into the forest he encounters Hester. They discuss life in a friendly gesture. Dimmesdale explains how miserable, and awful his life is, as he states, “But, now, it is all falsehood!-all emptiness!-all death!” (173). Hawthorne is trying to display a theme of sinful living through Dimmesdale 's life. He is trying to show how sin affects everybody 's life through strife. Sin affects everybody in many different ways even a holy pastor which displays a lot of the humanity in people, and how

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