Trauma In Adolescence

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Between the years of toddle-hood and adolescence, many developmental changes occur. During this time both the mind and body are beginning to reach maturity. Traumatic stress can cause multiple changes in the development of these areas. Children who have experienced traumatic events have shown to have issues thinking clearly, reasoning, or problem solving. When living conditions are extremely unstable and dependency is lacking, out of desperation, children learn that they must become reliant on themselves. This can be attributed to the adaptation of constant distress resulting in the overuse of survival mode.
Starting at the time of birth and on through the adolescent years, the biology of the body is continuously changing. These changes can
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According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, neglect, physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, are all factors that can cause abnormal development of the brain. This abnormal development can even include a variation in the size of specific parts of the brain. A traumatized person may begin to have problems arriving at conclusions and/or considering different outcomes without the ability to abstain from some level of irrational behavior. They may even experience similar troubles while trying to learn new skills, processing new information and overall memory. These abnormalities can follow a child through adolescences and into adulthood.
To further elaborate on the mental issues caused by trauma in reference to memory, we must look into PTSD. When traumatizing events happen in early childhood, it can result in persistent PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder) simply due to
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During these changes they begin to understand and learn regulation of emotions through different thought processes; this includes using past experiences to govern these behaviors. The affect childhood trauma has on these processes can be seen in how problems are solved even into adulthood. Unresolved stress in childhood reduces the amount of inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA), and the production of opioids, which give us our “good feelings”. As a result, specific genes can be “turned on or off” and brain stress response systems can be wired permanently for oversensitivity and overreactivity (Anisman, Zaharia, Meaney, & Merali., 1998). Later, when effected persons are faced with normal stressors, because the development of stress response systems was abnormal, they may experience stress reactivity. Meaning, ones tolerance for threat and levels of responsiveness are very low, in turn causing egocentric instincts to take over. An illustration of this abnormality is, but not limited to, body dysregulation (over-reaction to stimulus of the senses; e.g., sight and sound). To use this illustration in a real life instance; John was severely beaten by this foster mother from the time he was 6 until he was 18. Once he was able to move away from his foster mother, John changed his name to Tyrone and moved several states away from her. Years passed and Tyrone never sought psychiatric

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